Debunking Byington: Book Review of Twenty-Two Faces – a Story of Multiple Personalities

This is an ongoing book review. As time allows, I will add to the text.

You are welcome to make comments on this publication. I ask is that you be respectful to the author and others who voice opinions.

Thank you in advance for your patience in reviewing this highly controversial book and for following guidelines set forth. This book includes acts of murder, rape, and other felonies that is why I ask that comments address the writing – not people making comments.

I decided to write what will be an exhaustive analysis and critique of 22 Faces because of the positive impact it is having on patients diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder, commonly known as multiple personalities and because of arguments and opinions against the contents of this book found on the Amazon book review section and the forum of the Dr. Phil Show.

In my opinion, there is a resurgence of the discovery of multiple personalities among American women and the subsequent psychiatric diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), therefore, it is extremely important to comb through this book to illustrate the inconsistencies in the narrative and the implausibility of the events the author declares occurred.

Supporting women abused as children is what society should do …. supporting a work of fiction touted as nonfiction is an act society needs to scrutinize particularly when crimes and childhood malfeasance are alleged.

This book is self-published and, therefore, was probably not scrutinized by a legal department with the vigor a conventional-publishing house would conduct prior to publication, therefore, statements made by the author require the reader to research whether or not the text is accurate.

Sexual abuse is horrid and dealing with the aftermath is difficult. Acts of ritual abuse undoubtedly occur. Satanists exist as a religion but I do not believe Byington’s depiction of this group are accurate.

Caveat: I am a former believer in multiple personalities and Dissociative Identity Disorder. I was entrenched in this lifestyle and psychotherapy for over 6 years and I have an excellent grasp of the inner workings of the events portrayed and alleged in this book.

Here we go…

~~~~~~~~~~

Judy Byington (Mrs.Weindorf) describes Twenty-Two Faces as a biography of Jenny Hill although the author also states that Jenny wrote the book. First question: is this an autobiography or a biography?

Byington states that Jenny Hill endured childhood sexual abuse, ritual abuse, satanic ritual abuse, kidnapping, parental abuse & neglect, sibling abuse, domestic abuse, Nazi mind control, divine intervention by God, psychiatric hospitalization, multiple personalities, and Dissociative Identity Disorder, to name a few. This book was published by Tate Publishing (May 15, 2012).

The author, Judy Byington, appeared on the Dr. Phil show on January 11, 2013 as did Jenny Hill and her son, Robert. (Note: Robert stated that Byington did not depict his family history accurately)

Retrieved 01-23-13.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 1. About the Author from her media kit @ www.22faces.com

Twenty Two Faces, A Division of Trauma Research Center, Inc.

Trauma Research Center CEO is Judy Byington, MSW, LCSW, retired. Author, Twenty-Two Faces,  and panel members are Linda Quinton-Burr, Ph.d, J.D. ; Susan Peterson, L.P.C. Therapist, Neurofeedback Specialist and Practitioner and Sharon Reese, mother to five children and 49 alter personalities and Author, Healing Broken Wings.

There is no such designation as LCSW – Licensed Clinical Social Worker, retired. One is either licensed or not licensed. One does not “retire” from this profession and retain a license to practice. The designation of “retired” is meaningless, misleading, and a professional designation created by the author.

2. Let’s look at the endorsement from the back cover:

Robert Kroon (1924 – June 24, 2007). According to Wikipedia (01-23-13) Kroon… “was a prominent Dutch journalist who reported on conflicts and other stories as a foreign correspondent from Africa, Asia and Europe for nearly 60 years.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Kroon

.Although Mr. Kroon died four (4) years before the publication of this work, the author secured an endorsement from him.

This blogger finds it highly unlikely that a journalist of Kroon’s stature would endorse a book without reading the final draft and highly unlikely to do so after death.

update: 03-29-13. There will be no further review of Judy Byington’s book. There is little credible evidence that any of the event occurred. I, and many others, critiqued this Amazon book reviews and asked the author specific questions – each and every time, the author did not address the questions, rather she attacked the questioner.

~~~~~~~~~~ Will not be back later. ~~~~~~~~~~

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When Therapists are Lunatics: A Review of 22 Faces by Judy Byington

Update: 04-21-14.  This post by Doug Mesner needs to be reposted periodically because this book, with all its unverifiable statements remains on the market and Amazon book reviews are still showing heated discussions. Judy Byington, the therapist turned author has many questions to answer regarding statements she insists are true, but have been debunked by readers.

Reblogged with permission by Doug Mesner @ Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/review/the-lunatics-are-all-therapists-a-review-of-22-faces-by-judy-byington

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Twenty-Two Faces.

By Judy Byington

Tate Publishing, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA

Book Review by Douglas Mesner

Twenty-Two Faces by Judy Byington falls within an outdated genre of prurient Satanic Panic supernatural-erotica-sold-as-a-true-story pulp novels which enjoyed a certain popularity throughout the 80s and 90s. It tells the story of one Jenny Hill, a former prostitute and drug abuser who, upon submitting herself to psychiatric attention, learned that she had Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) (now known as Dissociative Identity Disorder [DID]). Surely, this diagnosis must have come as quite a relief, as it promised that Hill herself need not bear any of the responsibility for her own actions, which the book describes as, at times, being outright psychopathic. The book makes quite clear that every foul thing Hill ever did — from slashing her sister with a razor blade out of mere curiosity of the consequences, to allowing herself to be pimped by a husband she met whilst working with sex offenders (he was one) — was actually the mischievous doings of personalities that resided within her, and without her own conscious awareness. Unfortunately, this ultimate absolution came at a predictable cost: in accepting the MPD/DID diagnosis, Hill would also have to necessarily accept that she was harboring “repressed memories” of traumas which she would need to recall in the course of reintegrating her fractured mind. Fortunately for Hill, however, nobody required of her that the heartbreaking story of traumatic abuse that she would “recall” need make any sense, and the fact that it doesn’t seems to have completely escaped her biographer, Judy Byington.

Invoking the specter of sinister, underground secret societies dedicated anti-human Evil (as well a the comparatively petty-minded abuse of Ms. Hill) Twenty-Two Faces pays homage to debunked Satanic Panic literature of years past, even placing the book Satan’s Underground by Lauren Stratford in the bibliography, despite the fact that this book was so thoroughly discredited as to be withdrawn from publication, with the author changing her name and running off, abandoning her claim to Satanic cult abuse to instead pose as a childhood victim of the Holocaust.

Of course, even the old MPD/DID narrative is dubious enough, to put it nicely. The most recent research from out of Harvard finds that, despite claims to otherwise, those diagnosed and demonstrating MPD/DID do not actually suffer amnesia between one personality state to the next. Nor has the notion of traumatic repression — the likes of which is described in “case studies” like the Jenny Hill story — stood up to scientific scrutiny in the course of the past 20+ years since MPD/DID enjoyed its Sybil-fueled faddish rise.

But, to argue against the credibility of Twenty-Two Faces by invoking current progress in brain research, or even arguing against the existence of wide-scale secretive Satanic cult mind-control plots, is to give the book far too much credit. Twenty-Two Faces doesn’t merely beggar the imagination in its over-the-top conspiracist description of MPD/DID (though this it does, with Jenny’s “alters” [alternate personalities] recognizing themselves as merely sublimated entities that reside in hidden “rooms” in Jenny’s mind, ever watching to take over when things get too hairy). Twenty-Two Faces defies scientific credibility altogether by being a supernatural tale. To wit, the book includes:

  • Prophecy: The protagonist’s birth is foretold by her uncle in exacting detail.
  • Extra Sensory Perception (ESP): apparently believing that child abuse can prove beneficial to the victim, author Judy Byington describes that the protagonist, Jenny Hill, was able to break through certain subliminal barriers, not in spite of, but because of, early humiliations
  • Divine guidance: desperate and in prayer, Jenny Hill hears “a soft, yet thundering voice”, which urges her to “continue to write down your life experiences, for one day a book will be written.”
  • Divine intervention: In the midst of a Satanic ceremony in which she is bound to an altar, Jenny Hill is spared from sacrifice by a bare-footed “white-robed male personage, surrounded in a glorious White Light”. (Had this “personage” taken a little effort to arrive just a moment earlier, he could have spared the unlucky girl next to Hill, who is said to have been decapitated… but I’m sure His schedule is as busy as His Ways mysterious.)
  • Spirit Possession: Making clear that possession isn’t merely a more primitive cultural interpretation of DID, Byington describes that Hill suffered BOTH DID and spirit possession, the latter being cured by the prayers of LDS church officials

Twenty-Two Faces follows the life of Jenny Hill as presumably reconstructed from her memories, “recovered memories”, and diaries in which Hill and her varied “personalities” wrote and signed entries. Remarkably, despite these diaries, Jenny Hill — apparently never curious as to who else was writing in her private pages — is supposed to have been unaware of her “alter” personalities until having entered therapy as a psychiatric in-patient.
We are made to understand that Hill begins to experience “lost time” at the age of 4, when her abuse is said to have begun. The lost time is accounted for as episodes during which other personalities took over her consciousness so that Hill might not be troubled with the terrors of the abuse she began suffering at that age. One would think that such episodes, starting at such an early age, would establish an expectation of occasionally lost time, or an acceptance on the part of the protagonist that she had never quite grasped what time is. Not so with Ms. Hill. Not only did she fully grasp the cultural context and broad implications of the depravities that are said to have befallen her at age 4, she is also uncannily aware of the dates and times that eluded her at an age when most children are unable to properly read a clock.
The antagonist of Twenty-Two Faces, Hill’s oppressor, is the quintessential villain of conspiracy folklore, managing membership in several scheming cabals which may appear paradoxical or mutually exclusive to the untrained paranoid. Not only is he a God-less Jew, but “turncoat” Nazi Jew who worships Satan. His name is Dr. Greenbaum, and his legend precedes this rambling and dissonant tome within the fringes of hysterical recovered memory-derived folklores, best explicated by a Dr. Corydon Hammond in a speech he gave in 1992 titled Hypnosis in Multiple Personality Disorder: Ritual Abuse.

Hammond, telling of this dastardly Jewish Nazi Satanist, whose existence was reported by entranced subjects of recovered memory therapies, speculated upon Greenbaum’s designs for world domination: “My best guess is that the purpose of it [the satanists] is that they want an army of Manchurian candidates — tens of thousands of mental robots who will do prostitution, do child pornography, smuggle drugs, engage in international arms smuggling, do snuff films, all sorts of lucrative things and do their bidding. And eventually, the megalomaniacs at the top believe, [they will] create a satanic order that will rule the world.”

This is heady stuff. However, the Dr. Greenbaum of Twenty-Two Faces fails to live up to one’s expectations of a such a world-dominating force. For all his power, the evil Doktor still remains very careful to return Jenny home on time for supper after her Satan-appeasing torture sessions, lest her parents become suspicious that something is amiss. This, unfortunately, renders a certain climactic twist-in-the-plot senseless, as we learn that Hill’s parents were in on the whole thing all along.

Herr Doktor is aided by two bumbling teenage ne’er-do-well buffoons, both of whom he regularly whacks with his gnarled cane while they openly discuss — like Scooby Doo-grade villains — the evil plots they are enacting. Hill remembers every word of it, even full statements spoken backward, as Satanists apparently like to do. You see, Hill’s memory for these past events is near photographic. Thus, when Hill meets a wheelchair-bound friend in a home for the disabled who describes her condition — which finds her skull grotesquely inflated with water — as encephalitis, I can only wonder why the poor girl wouldn’t know that her condition would actually be called “hydrocephalus”.

Naturally, Hill also learns, by means of “recovered memories” that she was raped by her father. She invites her parents to her psychiatric hospital, where she is an in-patient, so that she may accuse him. Apparently heartbroken and outraged, her father storms out. More narrative incoherence occurs some pages later when it is reported that Hill was saddened to not be invited over for the following Family Christmas.

All of this idiocy might be amusing if it was all written with competent pacing and prose. As it is, the reading is entirely tedious, and it seems that every other page we have to go through the whole `where-am-I-what-have-I-done?’ routine.

The book has a forward written by one Dr. Colin Ross, of whom I will say nothing, but please see my previous piece about this dubious expert here: http://www.process.org/discept/2010/02/08/dr-colin-a-ross-psychiatry-the-supernatural-and-malpractice-most-foul/

The book also contains an endorsement from one Joyanna Silberg, Ph.D., Past President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD) which, if anything, says something negative about the ISSTD more than it tells us anything substantive about Byington’s book. Silberg claims that she and her peers “are all too familiar with the kinds of crimes and disorders described in 22 Faces.” Indeed, this year the ISSTD is hosting a conference which will feature a lecture on the topic of Ritual Abuse given by one Ellen Lacter, whose website offers helpful (if hardly coherent) tips such as “Pray a perimeter of protection against everything of witchcraft”, and discredited British therapist Valerie Sinason.

And here we have a real problem: therapists hiding their most unhinged paranoid fantasies under a veneer of scientific credibility derived from case studies and surveys applied to those whom they’ve previously infected with their conspiracist ideas. Never mind that Past Life Regression and Alien Abduction narratives, too, are derived from “recovered memories”; to question the bizarre claims put forward by Byington or the perpetually panicked ISSTD faithful is to invite criticisms that you, in fact, have an “agenda”. To doubt the truth of recovered memory narratives is to support child abuse.

This tactic of argumentation is truly offensive, as it hijacks children’s rights and attempts to create human shields of real victims as protection against criticisms directed at patently absurd claims. In the proper context, Twenty-Two Faces is a helpful book, as it illustrates this problem clearly for those who may doubt the magnitude to which conspiracists have over-run the study of Dissociative Disorders. Byington does not simply misappropriate the condition of multiple personalities as a plot device for her ridiculous book, she shows the condition for what it largely (if not entirely) is: a collaborative therapeutically-created delusion. In trying to expose a Satanic conspiracy, Byington unwittingly exposes a foul movement that exploits vulnerable mental health consumers. Let’s hope the licensing boards and professional associations eventually move to erase such embarrassments from practice.

Chris Costner Sizemore: AKA The Three Faces of Eve (1927- )

Update 01-11-14. To date, I know of one high profile case of multiple personalities or Dissociative Identity Disorder that did not claim childhood sexual abuse as it antecedent or cause. That case is reported by Hershel Walker, former American football icon, who claims his multiple personalities were caused by childhood bullying.

If there are people out there who claim to have developed multiple personalities by causes other than childhood child abuse, I’d be interested to hear from you.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Christine (Chris) Costner Sizemore

born 1927 -

Most Noted for:

Diagnosed in the 1950s, she is considered by some to be the first documented case of multiple personality disorder in the 20th century. Chris Sizemore is known by the pseudonym, Eve.

Sizemore had eight psychiatrists during her lengthily treatment that spanned over two decades. Corbett Thigpen and colleague, Hervey Cleckley, M.D., published a book that was a historical case study based on her life titled: “The Three Faces of Eve” which gained best-seller status as did the movie by the same title.

During the later part of her illness and recovery from multiple personality disorder, Chris Sizemore was treated for four years by Dr. Tony Tsitos in Virginia.

Early childhood traumas:

Chris Sizemore, in a YouTube documentary “Hard Talk,” a BBC Interview, said that at the age of two, she experienced three consecutive traumas.

  1. her mother cut her arm badly
  2. she saw a drowned man being recovered from a ditch, heard the word “death,” and began to believe that anyone who was sick or hurt was “dying.”
  3. she witnessed a man cut in half at a lumber yard.

Chris Sizemore repeatedly states that it was with the help of her psychiatrists, devoted family, and her belief in God that saw her through her illness and led to her recovery.

Publications:

1958.  The Final Face of Eve

1977. I’m Eve

1989. A Mind of My Own

Sources:

Georgia Encyclopedia

Sizemore, Chris Costner, 1989. A Mind of My Own.

Wikipedia: “Chris Costner Sizemore”

YouTube: “Multiple Personality Disorder on Hard Talk BBC Interviews – Chris Costner Sizemore, Part I”rumiscience”  watch?v=CTvr2fDBjmg Retrieved 3/14/11.

Australian Author Releases Memoir About Living with Multiple Personalities

Ineke Hill talks about Dissociative Identity Disorder

Oct. 3, 2013, 12:30 p.m.

CARRICKALINGA, Australia – Carrickalinga writer Ineke Hill will launch her memoir, faceless friends, on October 12, to coincide with Mental Health Week.

Ineke lives with the condition Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), formerly known as multiple personality disorder, which came about as a result of a traumatic, abusive childhood.

“The book eventuated from a stoical determination to seek freedom from overwhelming pain and memories,” Ineke said.

Full Story Victor Harbor Times, South Australia

Another Multiple Personality, Another Memoir, Another Invitation to the Dr. Phil Show

Graduate shares her story about multiple personalities

Written by Emily Stephenson | Posted: August 27, 2012

UVU graduate and Miss UVU runner-up Jenny Hill recounts her experiences with ritual abuse and her multiple personalities in the recehtly published “Twenty-Two Faces: Inside the Extraordinary Life of Jenny Hill and Her Twenty-Two Multiple Personalities” by Judy Byington.

Byington and Hill have been piecing together the book for the past 20 years since Hill had been seeing Byington, a former therapist, for treatment. Hill wanted to write and felt that her experiences of abuse could help others. Hill has received various threats about publishing her book.

For the past 17 years, Byington and Hill have been piecing together Jenny’s biography. Since the age of 7, Hill has written her experiences in journals, feeling that in doing so, she could eventually help others. Hill claims that as a 5-year-old she was raped, tortured, watched another child be murdered and was threatened with death if she told anyone. Her perpetrators are still on the loose.

“I met her about 17 years ago,” said Byington. “I had been an Alberta Canada Mental Health Supervisor, then Director of Provo Family Counseling Center and counseled several ritually abused women who carried multiple personalities.”

Byington explained that since Jenny was not allowed to process her stressful experiences in order to cope, her thinking patterns separated into 22 multiple personalities – an extreme analysis outside mainstream psychiatry and psychology circles, yet Byington continues to sell the therapy.

According to Byington, each year in the U.S. over six million children are investigated for physical, sexual or emotional abuse, and it is estimated that millions more go unreported. The resource of this statement are not provided; are we to take Byington’s word for it?

“Multiple personalities are always caused by child abuse,” said Byington. “It has to do with the child’s developing brain, severity of the abuse and whether or not they are locked into a traumatic situation from which they can’t escape.” Careful when making an “all” statement. One of the first women diagnosed, treated, and recovered from multiple personality disorder was Chris Sizemore AKA “The Three Faces of Eve” In Sizemore’s memoirs she repeatedly explains that the trauma she sustained was from witnessing horrific events as a young child. She does not connect child sexual abuse or repressed memories to multiple personalities as most proponents of these odd theories do.

“Since the Salt Lake Tribune and Utah Daily Herald articles about “Twenty-Two Faces” were published three weeks ago, I’ve had nine ritual abuse survivors ask for free counseling through our website, http://www.22faces.com,” said Byington.

She explained ten ritual abuse survivors approached her at the first book signing at Barnes and Noble saying that they were grateful that Jenny was speaking out. Is Byington offering psychotherapy without a license?

Byington explained that there are eight adult Occult covens here in Utah. An adult coven is a group of about six to eight people who generally form a group in high school. Covens also come from multi-generational satanic families where fathers teach torture techniques to their own children. Worshippers are very secretive and are addicted to torture and murder. This thinking and nonsense began in the 1980s and most, if not all, were debunked by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the US, by researchers, and by former patients manipulated into these beliefs.

“These aberrant rites are everywhere, people just don’t know about them, or refuse to recognize the problem,” said Byington. Again, are we to accept that all these covens are able to keep all members quiet about their activities? I don’t think so – 3 people cannot keep a secret for long. But Byington wants the public to think that hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of people remain silent. It defies reason and logic.

Hill received almost straight As while attending UVU and graduated as an LPN according to Byington who goes on to say that Jenny Hill was able to accomplish this because she compartmentalized stress within her alter personalities. “She’s an amazing person for what she’s been through,” said Byington.

Byington explained that the LDS church (church of Latter Days Saints AKA Mormon Church) conducted a study known as “The 1990 LDS Report on Ritual Abuse.” After interviewing over one hundred ritual abuse survivors across the nation the committee reported that, “45 witnessed human sacrifice.” What is the current analysis by the Mormon Church? Has the LDS retracted or otherwise updated or revised their previous statements? The report is 22 years old, what, if anything, is going on in the alleged covens in the state of Utah, USA?

“If you’ve been abused, don’t be ashamed of it,” said Byington. “Know that you can overcome it. If it’s difficult to talk about, then start writing. That will move subconscious thoughts into the conscious and help you cope.” I agree with Byingtonn on this point. Shame need not be part of the equation.

Byington said that victims need to understand that anger is one of the most devastating affects of trauma and abuse. She explains that there is a fear behind the anger and you can discover what that fear is. Byington advises that victims try to forgive those who wronged them and research ways to over come their fears.

“Believe in yourself, know that you are a Child of God,” said Hill. “He wants you to be happy. No matter the challenge you can overcome anything if you set your mind on it.”

 

 

 

Herschel Walker tells Skyline students how to cope with life

Hershel Walker, American football legend, continues to educate the public about the bullying he sustained in school that allegedly led his psyche to split into multiple personalities.

Associated Press

Former NFL player and Heisman Trophy winner Herschel Walker, left, came to Skyline to promote his book “Breaking Free: My Life with Dissociative Identity Disorder” and to help students deal with it.

In trying to protect himself from the pain of bullying, he developed Dissociative identity disorder, also known as multiple personality disorder.

“The first thing I thought of was Sybil,” he said referring to a controversial 1976 movie. “I thought, ‘I’m not Sybil; I’m not mean.'”

Herschel-Walker-tells-Skyline-students-how-to-cope-with-life.html

Retrieved 9/19/11.

NEW! ESPN Documentary Series Includes Herschel Walker, His Football Career & His Multiple Personalities

Cropped photo of Herschel Walker at PE4LIFE Da...

Image via Wikipedia

New SEC ‘Storied’ Documentary Series Slated for ESPNU; ‘Herschel’ Set for September 7

ESPN’s award-winning Content Development unit (30 for 30) will create four one-hour documentaries highlighting the traditions, rivalries and unique stories of the Southeastern Conference it was announced today at the conference’s Media Days event in Birmingham, Ala. The “Storied” series will debut on ESPNU Tuesday, Sept. 7 at 8 p.m. ET with Herschel, about former University of Georgia and pro football standout, Herschel Walker.

About the film

Produced in conjunction with NASCAR Media Group, Herschel explores how Herschel Walker’s career in the SEC was legendary, but his journey off the field was filled with struggle, pain, and ultimately, redemption. Growing up in rural Georgia, Walker was relentlessly bullied for being overweight and having a severe stutter. He turned those taunts into motivation, transforming himself into a superior athlete.

…But despite those accomplishments, Walker endured mental anguish for years over the unresolved childhood traumas. Eventually he was diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder and underwent intensive psychotherapy to heal.

Read more: Documentary Series for ESPNU with Herscel Walker Set for September VIA press release from ESPN.

Retrieved 7/20/11.

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