Ticker Tape: Mental Health Topics & More

Mental health issues are vast and expand quickly. Keeping up with the constant stream of news reports and peer-reviewed articles 24/7/365 is a daunting task so here is a list of links and titles of news reports you may find interesting or useful.*

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The alliance in adult psychotherapy: A meta-analytic synthesis. http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2018-23951-001

United Kingdom: Couple with 400 Different Personalities Between Them, Stephanie Linning, Daily Mail, 03-28-18.

Why Handwriting Changes as you Age. CBS News, 02-01-11

Bullies Win: Elizabeth Loftus Awarded 2016 John-Maddox Prize for Courage

Two who resigned from the DSM-5 work group explain why. Psychology Today 10-01-15.

Child Taken from Mum with Multiple Personalities (Dissociative Identity Disorder)

Psychiatrists Maryann Weisman & Stacey Zuniga Arrested on Alleged Prescription Drug Crimes, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, USA.

False Memory Syndrome Led Woman to Make Farm Rape Claims in Devon. North Devon Journal, 5-21-15.

The Forgotten Childhood: Why early memories fade. National Public Radio: All things considered. 4-8-14

The Devil and Mercy Ministries: A conversation with Chelsea Darhower | Dysgenics| 05-04-15.

The San Antonio Four Go Back to Court | Texas Public Radio | Apr 20, 2015

 
Sybil: A Brilliant Hysteric? New York Times | 11-25-14. Barbara Dury, producer (Includes interview with this blogger)

Reforming Mental Health Care: How recovered memory treatments brought informed-consent Psychiatric Times | June 05, 2015  by Christopher Barden, J.D., Ph.D.
retrieved 03-24-15.

Could You Be Convinced You Committed a Crime That You Didn’t Commit?

 Constructing Rich False Memories of Committing Crime | Psychological Science | 11-04-14.

Testimony Reliance Unsettles U.S. Courts

False Memory Syndrome Foundation Advisory Board Profiles

Researchers are now able to erase and restore memories in rats

Out of Mind Out of Sight: Suppressing unwanted memories reduces their unconscious influence.

A Life in Pieces by Richard K. Baer

England: Suicide among mental health patients receiving home treatment doubles

*For information purposes only.

Legal corner: ” I have multiple personalities” abuse-excuse

This post lists links to decisions of the court whereby the defendant introduces that he/she has multiple personalities and, therefore, the alleged crime was not committed by the defendant, but an alter personality.

State v. Jackson|2010 Ohio 2297|20100524323

Ticker Tape: Questioning D.I.D. & Multiple Personalities (Treatments you might want to check out before buying)

This post will list psychotherapeutic treatments that leave me with questions about its use, scientific validity, and simple evidence that it works.

Psychotherapy for D.I.D., popularly known as multiple personalities, was debunked by the scientific community decades ago, yet the links below will leave you wondering if professional psychotherapists have learned anything from the debacle of the lucrative business of finding, then treating, alter personalities.

Psychotherapy is like any other health care, you are purchasing a service. I hope the links below help you check out treatments available before you choose to purchase any.

What it’s Like to Live with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), MedCircle, 07-08-18

 

 

 

Are Primary Causes of MPD Psychotherapists? by Scott Mendelson, M.D.

Dr. Mendelson examines the explosion of multiple personalities in the United States between 1980 to 1986 which can be viewed as a culture-bound syndrome – one most closely associated with the United States rather than a world wide mental illness seen in many other countries.
Scott Mendelson, M.D.

Scott Mendelson, M.D.

Posted: January 31, 2011 04:55 PM

“Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), or, as it is referred to in most recent version of the manual DSM-IV, Dissociative Identity Disorder, is a genuine psychiatric disorder. However, the numbers of cases of MPD are far higher in North America than in any other part of the world. Many suspect that this surplus of MPD cases is the product of American culture and over-indulgent psychiatrists and psychotherapists.”

In a 2004 review for the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, the American psychiatrist, Dr. August Piper, remarked that more MPD cases were discussed in the medical literature in the five years after inclusion in the DSM-III than in the preceding two centuries. Between 1980 and 1986, more than 6000 patients in the United States were diagnosed with the disorder. Champions of the disorder, such as psychiatrist Colin A. Ross, began to claim that MPD was rampant…”

Most psychiatrists believe that the diagnosis of MPD has gotten entirely out of hand, and it isn’t merely due to the unexpectedly large number of patients being diagnosed with the illness. … Personalities began to propagate like locusts. … Yet, reports of patients with hundreds of separate alter personalities became routine. For example, Dr. Richard P. Kluft, a psychiatrist specializing in the treatment of MPD at the University of Pennsylvania, reported in a 1988 paper that one of his patients had over 4000 “alters”.

Others suffer delusions and thought disorders bizarre enough to warrant diagnoses of schizophrenia rather than MPD. Still, the question remains as to what degree leading questions and indulgences of vivid imaginations have prompted the alternate “personalities” to come into being.”

“The sufferers of Multiple Personalities also appear to feed off each other’s imaginations. Websites and Internet discussion groups for “multiples” abound, and sufferers take pride in how many alter personalities populate their minds. Pseudoscientific jargon flows freely in sites aiming to provide a technical basis for the illness and snare “multiples” for cutting edge psychotherapy. … This is pure baloney.”

Full Article: Huffington Post Retrieved 4/2/11.

updated 11-23-14.

Multiple Personality Disorder and other culture bound psychiatric conditions are discussed in Dr. Mendelson’s new book, “The Great Singapore Penis Panic and the Future of American Mass Hysteria“.

Alters in Dissociative Identity Disorder Metaphors or Genuine Entities?

Clinical Psychology Review 22 (2002) 481–497

Harald Merckelbacha,Grant J. Devillyc, Eric Rassina,

Abstract
How should the different identities (i.e., alters) that are thought to be typical for dissociative identity disorder (DID) be interpreted? Are they just metaphors for different emotional states or are they truly autonomous entities that are capable of willful action?

This issue is important because it has implications for the way in which courts may handle cases that involve DID patients.

Referring to studies demonstrating that alters of DID patients differ in their memory performance or physiological profile, some authors have concluded that alters are more than just metaphors.

We argue that such line of reasoning is highly problematic.

There is little consensus among authors about the degree to which various types of memory information (implicit, explicit, procedural) may leak from one to the other alter. Without such theoretical accord, any given outcome of memory studies on DID may be taken as support for the assumption that alters are in some sense ‘‘real.’’

As physiological studies on alter activity often lack proper control conditions, most of them are inconclusive as to the status of alters. To date, neither memory studies nor psychobiological studies have delivered compelling evidence that alters of DID patients exist in a factual sense. As a matter of fact, results of these studies are open to multiple interpretations and in no way refute an interpretation of alters in terms of metaphors for different emotional states.

Conclusion
The older literature on DID offers some strong claims as to the literal status of alters. Anecdotal reports of alters differing in their allergic reactions, in their response to medication, and in their optical functioning abound (e.g., Miller, 1989). These anecdotes
led Simpson (1997, p. 124) to pose the following question: ‘‘Why not claim that they wear different size shoes?’’ …

Still, a literal interpretation of alters can also be found in the DSM-IV and in many serious articles on DID. In their thought-provoking essay on DID, Lilienfeld et al. (1999) present several examples of treatment interventions that seem to be predicated on the belief that alters in DID are independent agents. These examples include asking to meet an alter, giving names to alters, and encouraging alters to write letters to each other. On the basis of these examples, Lilienfeld et al. (p. 513) conclude that ‘‘many or most influential authors in the DID treatment literature treat alters as independent entities or even personalities, at least during the early phase of treatment.’’

It is this literal view on alters …. Yet, theoretical and methodological shortcomings of these studies restrict any conclusions that can be drawn from them. Memory studies on DID suffer from the absence of articulated theories about memory functioning in DID.

Psychobiological studies, on the other hand, primarily suffer from the absence of proper control conditions. This is unfortunate, becauseit is now perfectly possible to specify control conditions for this type of research.

…Neither memory studies, nor psychobiological studies have elicited compelling evidence
that supports a literal view on alters in DID. …A case in point is Gleaves (1996, p. 48) who notes that ‘‘what is critical to understand is that acknowledging a patient with DID to have genuine experiences of alters as real people or entities is not the same as stating that alters are actually real people or entities.’’ Obviously, this conceptualization of alters is reminiscent of the position that alters exist largely as a result of role enactment in which patients become absorbed.

Thus, it is probably time to de-emphasize the literal interpretation of alters advocated by the DSM-IV. …

…Meanwhile, the hypothesis that alters in DID may be nothing more than the result of some patients’ tendency to attribute causality to inside agents, only becomes a coherent position when one seriously considers the possibility that expressed alters are metaphors rather than real entities.

Rebirthing Therapy: Candace Newmaker nee Candace Tiarra Elmore, dies in therapy at 10 years-old, a YouTube video

I came across this video while researching. It does not directly connect to Dissociative Identity Disorder, or multiple personalities. It does, however, show how death from fringe therapies happens more often than the psychology industry would have the public know. And, it reminds me of my friends who were treated for multiple personalities and died during treatment.

I attended the trials of the therapists who murdered 10-year-old Candace during a rebirthing session meant to bond her to Jean Newmaker, her adoptive mother. This YouTube video shows the slow torture of Candace during that psychotherapy session that led to her death. Some details I would add:

Jean Newmaker, Candace’s adoptive mother, was head of pediatric nursing at Duke University. Newmaker, however, was unable to assess that Candace was being suffocated during the rebirthing session.

Candace’s birth family (grandparents) attended the trials. I got to know them rather well over the weeks of the trial. They are a loving family. They told me they were hoping that Jean Newmaker, a single woman who had an above average lifestyle compared to their daughter, would give Candace opportunities that they could not. Instead, she killed their grandchild.

After Candace’s death, her birth family took action and were instrumental in getting the practice of rebirthing banned in Colorado where the incident occurred.

The treatment  some patients are subjected to during dissociative identity disorder amounts to torture. When a patient is continually badgered to “remember” their past as a means to heal old wounds, that is torture. When a patient is obviously regressing and getting worse during treatment –  that is torture. When a patient regresses and cannot function after therapy is initiated, is down right medical malpractice.

We must stop this senseless killing and the decline of patients mental stability during psychotherapy.

“YouTube video titled: This is Child Abuse, Not Therapy”

The Millenium Project has more information about the Candace Newmaker murder. Here is a link to where you can find some of the transcript of the session that ended her life after 2 weeks in therapy with Connel Watkins and Julie Ponder.

candace.htm

I remember this conversation that occurred as Candace was struggling to breathe under layers of sofa cushions and tightly wrapped in a flannel sheet. The child screamed, she begged; she pleaded for oxygen; she became silent. Her 10-year-old mind understood the concept of “death” and she accepted her fate after hours of struggling for air. Her last word being “No.”

Jean Newmaker was (and may still be) a pediatric nurse at Duke University. Candace vomited and defecated under the sofa cushions and blanket, yet none of the counselors (there were 4) nor adoptive-mother Newmaker recognized that Candace’s body was shutting down preparing for death.

This was a bone-chilling moment in my life to watch this video.

updated 12-26-14.

Creative Commons License
Rebirthing Therapy: Candace Newmaker nee Candace Tiarra Elmore, dies in therapy at 10 years-old, a YouTube video by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.mentalhealtwww.mentalhealthmatters2.wordpress.comhmatters2.wordpress.com.
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