Second Patient Files Medical Malpractice Lawsuit Against Castlewood Treatment Center & Psychologist Mark Swartz for Inducing Multiple Personalites

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Second Woman Claims Clinic Gave Her “False Memories” of Satanic Rituals

Kevin Killeen

February 16, 2012 4:00 AM
Castlewood Treatment Center in Ballwin, USA

BALLWIN, Mo. (KMOX) —” A second woman has filed a malpractice lawsuit against a Ballwin treatment center, claiming she was hypnotized into thinking her eating disorder was rooted in “repressed memories” of cult involvement.Leslie Thompson, 26, filed the suit late yesterday against the Castlewood Treatment Center and her former therapist, psychologist Mark Schwartz.

The suit filed alleges that while undergoing treatment at Castlewood for anorexia between December 2007 and May 2010, Thompson was led to understand that she had “multiple personalities,” and that she had repressed memories of participating in satanic rituals, even “witnessing the sacrificing of a baby.”

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Is it 2012? The profession of psychology & psychiatry falls further into disgrace. How a single profession can continue a downward spiral that seems to have no bottom, defies the laws of gravity. It seems to have found its own manner of spinning through the universe traversing time and place at will.

Patients continue to be commodities as in any other industry – some are expendable and will break. That’s an accepted fact of the manufacturing process – some widgets will work, others will break, and others will be OK for sale and distribution. Psychiatric patients are flesh and blood commodities when they fall prey to manipulative and self-serving psychotherapists who peddle outmoded and debunked psychological treatments in this case, that of the existence of multiple personalities and dissociative identity disorder.

Why are mental health patients not protected by the three largest medical-governing bodies in the United States, namely the American Psychiatric Association, the American Medical Association, and the American Psychological Association? How about adding the National Association of Social Workers? What organization bears the responsibility to protect patients? What will it take to force these organizations and their hundreds of thousands of members to stop this insanity?

It reminds me of politicians and some who hold public office who ignore warnings and cries of a constituent who endured personal tragedy that could have been adverted if only, for example, a traffic light had been installed at a busy intersection as requested.

The injured individuals bravely go to their local and state authorizes in an effort to change laws and to bring public awareness to their plight – only to be ignored – usually because, in this example, to install a traffic light would not be fiscally possible.

When is the patient heard? – when the patient becomes the person who held public office.

Read more http://abcnews.go.com/US/therapist-accused-implanting-satanic-memories/story?id=15043529#.T0fuQ3pAIxE

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Second Patient Files Medical Malpractice Lawsuit Against Castlewood Treatment Center & Psychologist Mark Swartz for Inducing Multiple Personalites by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at www.mentalhealthmatters2.wordpress.com.
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20 Comments

  1. ann clinton

     /  07/01/2012

    Castlewood treatment center damaged me in so many ways. Mark was such a dick to so many clients and their family. Just took my money and then had nothing to do with us after that. I was not one of his favorites.

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    • Hellow, Ann. Welcome

      Could you get a little more specific about your experiences at Castlwood? If you are interested, of course. You don’t have to mention names, but it would be helpful for me since I had a horrific time with a wacky psychiatrist too. You expanding your comments will also be helpful to those who come to this post seeking information.

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  2. Tania

     /  05/22/2012

    Castlewood Treatment Center saved my life. In my opinion this is an isolated incident. In my 6 months of treatment at Castlewood, my therapist used hypnosis twice as a means of relaxation, not as a form of therapy. Internal Family Systems is another form of therapy that is used at Castlewood that is a way that therapists are able to communicate with patients’ internal system, but is not a form of hypnosis. I am in recovery now and finally living my life one day at time thanks to the amazing people at Castlewood including Dr. Mark Schwartz, my AMAZING therapist and all of the staff that CW. The individual that said that Castlewood should be shut down is very foolish and has no clue what they are talking about. there is no treatment facility in the world like CW. I was in-patient at Johns Hopkins many years ago and Shepherd Pratt in Baltimore. I have been to many therapists and psychiatrists in the Baltimore/DC area in 12 years and none of them could help me. I was lost, out of control and ready to end my life. I had given up on treatment, but in my state I had no choice but to seek residential/in-patient treatment last year. Castlewood literally saved my life.

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    • Well Tania, I’m glad to know you are on the mend.

      You found solace in Castlewood, but others found just the opposite. You might give them a chance to speak and hear what they have to say. Castlewood treats multiple personalities via Internal Family Systems so I am not surprised you found it a positive experience unlike Johns Hopkins University who does not support MPD/DID and the past head of psychiatry, Dr. Paul McHugh is an outspoken critic.

      I find it interesting that Johns Hopkins with it’s high standards and status as a research university could not help, but the uneducated people as Castlewood could. Just sayin’

      Glad you stopped by.

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      • Tania

         /  05/22/2012

        well, Jeanette, I don’t want to argue with you, but the people that Castlewood are actually highly educated and the eating disorder program at Johns Hopkins doesn’t even offer one on one therapy only group therapy which is absurd. You cannot possibly attempt to treat a client’s E.D. through group therapy. it is impossible. Hopkins is not the expert on all medical and psychological conditions, I’m afraid. I know quite well. I had a wonderful experience with Dr. Graham Redgrave at the Hopkins program (a wonderful psychiatrist), other than that, the program is horrific. I am sorry that the women that are filing suits against CW had bad experiences and I hope they are getting the help that they need, but it in no way means that Castlewood is a bad place, treats its clients badly or that this sort of thing goes on all the time if at all. I know many people that have had incredible exeriences at CW. I am one of those people and know first hand the brilliant, highly educated, caring individuals that work at CW. I don’t know if you have personal experience, but I do. I know the truth, my truth. I am so grateful for my time there.

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        • Perhaps Castlewood is not a bad place, rather it is a place that hires uneducated people to treat patients. Some people take issue with that.

          Just curious if you want to share – were you treated for DID at Hopkins?

          p.s. Tania, we can argue – that’s what this blog is about. Hashing out ideas and opinions with each other. It’s nothing personal. 🙂

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          • Tania

             /  05/24/2012

            No I was not treated for DID. I do not have DID. I was treated for an eating disorder, depression, generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia. many of my friends at castlewood were being treated for DID as I was treated at Castlewood One which is where the majority of the DID cleints stay. I learned quite a bit about DID while I was there, lived side by side with clients that have DID and have many friends that have DID.

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    • Hi Tania, Sorry, I know you made another comment, but I can’t access it – I stink at computer stuff.

      Anyway, I’m glad that Castlewood helped you with your eating disorder. I’m curious – what do you think about the fact that the mental health practitioners are not educated? And, what do you think about the malpractice suits popping up?

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      • Tania

         /  05/24/2012

        the gist of the comment was that I do not have DID and was not treated for DID, but have many friends that have DID. I was treated at Castlewood One which is where most of the DID clients are treated. So I lived side by side with many DID clients.

        Why do you think that the practioners are uneducated? if you look at their credentials, they are all highly educated. In fact, even their on-line staff have masters degrees! they work for next to nothing just to get their feet in the door and work hands on with the clients helping with meds, food preparation, daily check-ins. they are typically finishing up their schooling or just out of school. If I’m not mistaken, even the maintenance man has a degree! it’s an amazing place. breathtakingly beautiful to boot. I didn’t want to leave! The people there are wonderful!

        the lawsuits are really unfortunate. Mostly for the women involved. I truly hope they get the help that they need. getting even or money back from Castlewood isn’t going to heal them. and I think they are from MN which means it is highly likely their insurance paid for EVERYTHING. there’s no way that Mark Schwartz intentionally hurt these women.

        I will tell you that memories could be contagious.. some of the women there were starved for attention. maybe they didn’t get it from their families. a tragic event that was discussed in group one day, then suddenly became part of someone’s story the next day. it didn’t always make sense. I don’t have an explanation for the horrible memories that these women are experiencing. and yes there was a woman that had a similar story while I was there about satanic cults, but there’s no way that a therapist intentionally implanted a memory in their heads! eating disorder treatment is extremely complicated. there are so many layers of trauma, family history, legacy burdens, social pressures, etc.. the list goes on and on… so many layers to address to get to the root to begin to heal.

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        • Well, Tania I am not one of those people who see credentials and assume that person is educated. Let’s face it – out of 100 doctors who graduate, one is at the bottom of his/her class and 50% are below the median. Take Richard Kluft for example. He has both an MD and a PhD. – highly educated and spouting nonsense about satanic cults. Look at another icon in the field, Colin Ross – who has an MD degree. He talks about conspiracy theories and more nonsense than one can take in. Go to the Colin Ross Institute @ http://www.rossinst.com/ and see for yourself. The ideas and research these two men pass off as psychotherapy for sale is criminal.

          I sued my former psychiatrist and the hospital where he worked and you are correct that it did not heal me. What it did is have an impact on the professional life of the doctor and the hospital and forced them to be accountable for their actions. I felt a personal, moral, and social responsibility to stop or at least slow them down from practicing bad medicine. They are so arrogant they continue to do so anyway. BTW, I had 100% insurance so we cannot assume anything about that.

          Thank you for acknowledging that memories can be contagious. That is exactly what I experienced when a patient of MPD/DID therapy. It even became a contest for who could be the sickest although it do not believe any of us did so intentionally.

          I am glad you were able to get some treatment missing the DID bullet. Some women get into it and, as all the others, deteriorate instead of finding a healthy life.

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          • Tania

             /  05/25/2012

            I am very sorry that you had such a horrible experience. I agree with you on the educational stuff.. just b/c you have a PhD, doesn’t mean you graduated at the top of your class and that you know everything or that you’re brilliant or know how to deal with patients.. very good point.

            do you believe that that the diagnosis is a fraud? did you have an experience similar to the two women filing the law suit against Castlewood?

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          • Tania, I wouldn’t call the diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder a fraud exactly because many who treat it actually believe it is legitimate in spite of the growing evidence against it. So they believe themselves – which is what I think makes them dangerous when they teach others about it.

            Do I have lawsuit experience? Is that what you are asking? Or do I know of others who sued their therapists?

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          • Tania

             /  05/25/2012

            I guess I am wondering if your lawsuit against your therapist was similar to that of the current one against CW. where false memories were allegedly implanted. you don’t have to share if you don’t want to…

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          • Tania, my suit was for malpractice and negligence. I won a settlement 2 days before trial.

            Like

  3. Russ

     /  03/09/2012

    Jeanette, you can contact me on Facebook (or by using the name in my yahoo email address that I am using to post on this site. If you want to do an expose’ on Mercy, I have the contact info of several people you should speak with who would like to tell you about their experiences with Mercy Ministries.

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  4. Russ

     /  03/08/2012

    Thank you for your insight and your interest, Jeanette.
    Mercy Ministries is a free residential treatment program that my daughter went to (she had just turned 18 and had anorexia since age 11) for one year, there are several different branches in the U.S. such as Lincoln, CA where my daughter was, Nashville, St. Louis and Monroe LA. They were shut down in Australia (mostly due to loss of donors for using exorcisms and also bilking some girls out of money in their accounts) but now are trying to make a comeback internationally by a name change in New Zealand, calling it “A Girl Called Hope.” I hope they don’t fool people in New Zealand with this name change, this needs to be exposed as well.
    This has been going on for years at Mercy MInistries, and it needs to stop. I’ve recently come to know a family who went through this almost 10 years ago (the girl cut off her family due to having repressed memories of sexual abuse, then realized years later that none of it was true, she lost all that time with her family and endured years of needless hurt and anguish) and Mercy is still perpetrating these destructive therapy methods to this day. Every former member I’ve talked to (and I’ve talked to many) also said they are are cult. Of course you never realize you are in a cult while you’re in it, only afterward and this often takes years to realize. I know an ex-Mercy girl who is now basically homeless, Mercy provided her with no help or resources after being there for a whole 6 months, they just kicked her out for “lack of progress. God doesn’t set a timetable for healing, but Mercy MInistries does. I’ve also spoken to many who say that Mercy has a very distorted view of who God is and that ex-members have a really hard time because they almost come to believe that Mercy Ministries is God, and they have a difficult time separating the two.
    I remember when my daughter was looking at going to Mercy, I looked at their website. They had all these “success stories.” I remember that almost every last “success story” had to do with some kind of sexual abuse that they had overcome. I just assumed at the time that sexual abuse must really be that prevalent…but now looking back, there is another possibility….what if these girls all received the same “therapy” and believed these repressed memories regardless of if they were really true? Something to ponder….
    There is hope for my daughter and my family, but I don’t want any more girls or there families to have to go through this living Hell, which ironically is caused by a so-called “Christian” organization. God is not on the side of any organization that practices mind control, deceit and uses dangerous therapy methods, and if not on this earth all those responsible will have to answer to God for what they have done, and continue to do to girls and their families.
    While Mercy Ministries is free financially, if anyone knew the true potential costs in terms of their mental health, their relationship with their families and their relationship with God then nobody would go there. It almost cost my daughter her life.

    Here is the link to their website.
    http://www.mercyministries.org/

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  5. Russ

     /  03/08/2012

    My daughter has been a victim of this kind of therapy (this one was at Mercy Ministries), but she doesn’t know it yet and truly believes these horrific things that her “recovered memory therapy” has led her to believe. I was just contacted by a woman yesterday whose daughter was at the same branch of Mercy Ministries during the same time period that my daughter was, and they are bewildered as to why their daughter cut off contact with them (we only found out about why our daughter did by accident, her “repressed memories of sexual abuse), and this poor woman doesn’t even know where her daughter is now. This is a place that didn’t see fit to contact us to let us know that our daughter attempted suicide under their care…when we got the ER bill a couple of months later and we got it out of them what happened, they replied “it was her responsibility to tell you, not ours”. Incredible, you can’t make this stuff up. She was never anywhere close to suicidal before she underwent her “therapy” at Mercy Ministries. I just thank God that I do know where my daughter is, and that she has finally agreed to limited contact with us through letters.

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    • Hi Russ, thank you for stopping by to share your experiences.

      It’s common for people who call themselves professionals in mental health to say that their patient (your daughter, for ex) is legally an adult and they cannot divulge any information to you. Now that I think of it, they should have given the ER bill to your daughter to pay if indeed these professionals consider her an adult. Why send you the bill?

      I am interested in knowing more about Mercy Ministries. Can you tell us where they are or provide a link? I would like to do an expose’ about them on this blog. Mental health consumers and their families need to be aware of their behavior.

      I am happy to know you have some contact with your daughter even if it is through letters. Through my experience with thinking I was abused when I was not, be aware that anything you send to her is probably going to be scrutinized over and over and over by her therapist/minister to find evidence of your guilt. That’s simply how repressed memory therapy works. You are guilty and most of therapy time is spent trying to find evidence of the reality of bogus memories.

      Best to you. JB

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