You Tube: Dissociative Identity Disorder, Medications and Pokemon?

This YouTube was produced by a young woman (age 19); it runs 11:12 minutes. In my opinion, this is one of the best videos I’ve seen on the web.

She discusses medication, how many diagnoses she has received since the age of 9. She seems to find dissociative identity bad, due to the “Sybil” patient who became and urban legend and the fear she now feels she needs to face that it is true.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhWsNYl1474

Retrieved 2/24/12.

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10 Comments

  1. astridanonymous

     /  04/29/2012

    At about age 30-31, I mentioned multiple personalities to my mother. She stammered for about 2 minutes and then said in a very angry voice, “You know what that was? Those doctors give you drugs and they hypnotize you and they make you do things!!” After that I tried to tell her that I had been affected by the “disease”, and she went into melodrama, carrying on so I could say nothing else. She started to weep and I wound up comforting her for some time, it became all about her, I said very little. She also said, “You know what I really had? PTSD!”

    That is the entirety of our conversation on the topic.

    Looking back, I think she stopped being a “multiple” when she stopped seeing psychiatrists in about 1993-1994. This is when we moved to a different state. She never mentioned that it was over, but the personalities dwindled over time.

    We were not a family who talked about things. We were absolutely not allowed to talk about my mother’s problems. If my siblings and I mentioned it my dad would become very angry. We also were not allowed to mention it to anyone outside the house. So, when the personalities went away no one said anything. It was just not discussed. In my family, the kids acted happy and got good grades and never spoke about feelings, my mother was the one who had the feelings and we needed to not upset her in any way. She was sort of a ticking emotional time bomb and we tiptoed around.

    When we visited her in the mental hospitals, it was also always “act happy, say only positive things, we don’t want to upset your mother in any way.”

    It is clear from my brief conversation with my mother that she feels very victimized by this whole thing, which is certainly true. It was also clear that it had never crossed her mind that her children might have been affected — she seemed very surprised I would say such a thing. Maybe because we always put on such a front of being strong and unaffected (because we had to), she assumed we really were strong and unaffected. She is a very literal person and it often does not occur to her that someone can possibly say one thing and mean another.

    This is something that it is very difficult for me to understand and forgive. It went so far as my mother pretending to be a child alter and having her “first period” when I was about 13, and I helped her with that like a parent. There were countless scenarios like that, where she was the child and I was the parent. Yet, she never worried about how DID might have affected me, and she didn’t ever even bother to inform me it wasn’t real.

    What do you do with this sort of life? For many years, even after DID, our backwards parent-child dynamic went unchanged. When I was about 23, she started gambling and shopping compulsively and I started paying her rent. I was what you might call “a doormat.” She’d also want my advice on career and dating matters, and just like when I was a kid, I’d pretend to be strong and know things, even though I was totally clueless.

    They say that in order to stop being a doormat, you have to get up off the floor. This is one thing I am working on. Right now that means no contact with my mother, even though she has gambled away her car and bank accounts. I know that my mother is really mentally ill, and that the whole debacle of DID therapy just made everything worse. At the end of the day, she is left with her original mental illness AND all the trauma related to that therapy.

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/29/2012

      Gees, that’s some hard experiences you share. Patients and those who love them do not win in this therapy. As you know, the entire family, friends, church groups, work mates and anyone else close to the multiple become part of the play – so to speak. Each player has his/her part and if that person doesn’t fit or questions too much they are outcast and/or replaced. The only way MPD/DID can operate is if all those who surround the victim/patient cooperate and agree that mpd exists.

      I wish something could be done about the difficult childhood you had and the reverse parenting you lived. You seem on top of things now but that won’t get the years you lost back any more than I’ll get mine.

      What your family experienced is criminal.

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  2. astridanonymous

     /  04/28/2012

    @Altus — she is 19 and has been raised in some backwards therapy world… I don’t think it’s surprising she would accept what her doctors, and probably her parents, are telling her. My mother was falsely diagnosed with multiple personality disorder and it took me until I was 31 to figure out it wasn’t real (my mother knew it wasn’t real but never told me until I asked at age 31). And there were A LOT of red flags — so many that it makes it hard to explain to people how I could have been so blind.

    One possible explanation is that it is really hard to accept that level of betrayal. It is very difficult to know that these authority figures have been so dishonest. I wanted to believe that there was order and fairness in the world. It’s really hard to swallow when supposed “experts” are so far off base.

    **
    Also — J.B. — I think that there is a typo in your blog title, “Multiple personalitied…” rather than “personalities”

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/28/2012

      @astridananymous. Wow. Your mother actually fessed up to MPD being fake? What did she say about why she went along with it.

      Some therapists are in this nonsense for the money, but I think the majority believe in what they are doing – and that is what makes them dangerous.

      Thanks for the typo heads-up.

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  3. Altus

     /  04/25/2012

    @astridanonymous. What amazes me about this woman is she seems so open to accepting yet another potential misdiagnosis after apparently having been drugged up and misdiagnosed for years. I agree, the tests that measure these conditions are suspect…the treatment even more so.

    Say you are easily hypnotized and creative. You go to therapist because of some condition like depression related to a job or divorce. The therapist performs this test on you…and viola! you could have multiple personalities! or the modern term, DID. You go through a therapy like Richard Schwartz’s internal family systems, IFS, and the therapists starts convincing you you have “parts” and address these parts. (IFS was covered elsewhere in the blog.) Because you the creative type and very open to suggestion, the suggestibility of this “parts” therapy coming from your therapist becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy as you start to think of yourself in parts.

    So after a few years in therapy, a bright artistic man or woman who hits a bump in the road and turns to a therapist for help ends up with DID and personalities to go with it…not to mention he or she not able to deal with lives challenges because all energy goes into dealing with the diagnosis and treatment. Very sad.

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb4345/is_1_36/ai_n29406570/

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/26/2012

      well. Altus, that’s how it actually occurrs. The first paper I published was titled: “Orphan of the Memory Debates”. I used the example of Stephen King. What if he sought a therapist instead of a closet in his house he turned into an office? He would have spent years telling stories to a shrink instead of being a brilliant writer.

      That’s what many of these therapists do – they suck the life blood from you and leave you on the floor bleeding while they go see another patient.

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  4. astridanonymous

     /  04/25/2012

    What a disturbing video. That poor girl.

    I really have to wonder about her therapist who says she’s too young for schizophrenia? 19 is classic age for the onset of schizophrenia:

    http://www.schizophrenia.com/szfacts.htm

    You have to wonder about a therapist who would tell someone that 19 is too young for schizophrenia. Of course, I also have to wonder whether the EIGHT psychotropic meds that poor girl is on might have something to do with her hallucinations.

    I also am appalled by the Dissociative Experiences Scale. I took the test myself and scored high. The test measures flakiness or spaceyness — as a somewhat vague person, I apparently could be considered to be “dissociative.” Reading the symptom list, a lot of heavy drinkers are probably also “dissociative.” My mother, who was falsely diagnosed with DID, was also spacey, probably what they’d call “hypnotizable.”

    The DES scale is beyond ridiculous. Some people are spacier than others, thank God some geniuses designed a scale to measure this. Not all humans are the same in every respect! You can measure differences among people using a survey! OMG!

    In my case, I tend to space out and get enthralled in a task and forget where I am. This was actuallly useful when I worked as a software engineer. I’d start writing code and 8 hours later I’d sort of wake up and my program would be done. Once, a coworker stopped by my office to ask me something, and it took me a minute to remember how to speak English. I’d gone into some sort of “zone” and so I just sat there looking at him, trying hard to remember how to speak. I eventually got there. Anyway, I was thought to be good at my job.

    Maybe this girl should consider a career in engineering, given her high score on the DES scale. Another option might be art — I have gone into a similar “zone” and lost time while painting, which I do as a hobby. This zone has nothing to do with other personalities or past or future events, I believe it’s genetic and like all personality traits it has good and bad aspects.

    Maybe if she could get a competent therapist, she could make her spaciness work for her, as I have in the past.

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/25/2012

      yah know, astridanonymous – this young girl could very well be suffering from normalcy!

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  5. Altus

     /  04/24/2012

    Wow, all that time, all those diagnoses and medications and such a young woman. She’s so articulate and bright. Here is a story about a man who was diagnosed with MPD and after years and lots of pain and treatment, it turns out he had high functioning autism. He is starting a company now and doing fantastically well…all those years wasted “treating” him.

    http://www.necn.com/04/19/12/Virtual-world-teaches-skills-to-people-w/landing_health.html?&apID=dc98aa9ee08346fdb295b9e7f8db162e

    All of it makes you kind of wonder about our mental “health” care system. Armed with a DSM, “health” care people can now diagnosis and treat more maladies than ever before, but as you can see from these two cases, years of misdiagnosis are not at all uncommon. Meanwhile the drug companies and the therapists make tons of money from these errors. If they were inventing a product, they’d go broke.

    What is truly sad about these two cases is there seems to be nobody who helped these folks try to achieve a healthy life. The guy took it upon himself and found his own solution…this poor woman seems to believe everything told to her…to the extent she got a tattoo for an illness that might be one of many misdiagnosis she had. It would be great to hear a woman like this say, here’s how I am working with a “heathcare” professional to become healthy, it just doesn’t seem to be part of the equation.

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/24/2012

      @Altus, unfortunately misdiagnosis is all too common.

      But, the DID community uses it as proof that the dissociative identity disorder was there all the time. It is something like 6+ years, and of course having many other diagnosis) that Proves to people that the DID diagnosis is correct. I noticed in the hospital documents that my doctor conveniently waited for months to pass so he could use me as a statistic of being misdiagnosed or not diagnosed for 6-8 years. I, therefore, fell into the statistical pool of multiples perfectly

      I worked with children with autism when it wasn’t a “spectrum” disorder or as I see it, an umbrella to put people they don’t know what to do with. Kind of like the DDNOS diagnosis or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified? What? How’s that for a mouthful of crap? Autism is being revised in the next DSM. Hum, would that make some of them not exist?… I wonder.

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