Craigslist Classified Advertizement for Multiple Personality Treatment, USA

Craigslist is an online classified advertizing type of organization. www.craigslist.org

You can go there to find a cheap bike someone wants to get rid of or sell your old bookcase. There are hundreds of categories that connect people who need something with people who have something to sell.

This is the first time I’ve seen a Craigslist ad offering psychotherapy for multiple personalities. Maybe today is the day I Have seen everything.

~~~~~~~~~~~

NY NJ Hypnosis Multiple personality disorder (ny nj)


Date: 2012-05-10, 12:55PM EDT
Reply to: 7ntns-3007527534@comm.craigslist.org [Errors when replying to ads?]


Welcome to contact me please for more information call 718 698 2702 or leave a message.
http://www.annastherapy.com
– Feel happier
I am healer and hypnotist ..
Past life regression ..

  • Location: ny nj
  • it’s NOT ok to contact this poster with services or other commercial interests

PostingID: 3007527534

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17 Comments

  1. Hi Jeanette

    you wrote:

    > I reiterate what I’ve said before: I think it is dangerous for anyone with no mental health training
    > to be working with people with obvious mental and psychiatric disturbances as those you work
    > with demonstrate. Relying on the deductive reasoning of the engineering degree you hold could
    > very well assist your comprehension yet it offers no insight into psychiatric illnesses and possible
    > causes for them.

    I disagree with you totally.

    The problem I have here is that it would take me too long to tell you of all my experiences in order to demonstrate that I do know what I am talking about. What concerns me is that you assume that I don’t know what I am talking about, YET I claim and demonstrate success on a daily basis, success that those you do recognise can only dream about.

    You make many assumptions here which are wrong. For example my approach provides a lot more detailed insight than any other approach I know of. In fact insight and understanding are the keys. I am able to analyse and MEASURE the exact causes and effects as to why a particular problem exists. I am always able to ascertain exactly why the problem is there.

    What is dangerous is to have people waving qualifications around with no MEASURES of effectiveness or feedback in the loop to correct and improve things. The current status quo is that there is no expectation of success, this leads to a lack of feedback and the complete chaos that we see at the present.

    My experience is that no one I have met who has the label doctor, has ANY experience of living with these problems, and ABSOLUTELY ZERO awareness or understanding as to issues of living with these problems, let alone the actual causes or of any means to fix them. We both are fully aware of horror stories. What is really dangerous is to have people who say they know what they are doing, yet cause more damage, because they actually have no clue.

    The medical model is demonstrably WRONG full stop, therefore ANYONE who attempts to apply it in order to help someone is causing more harm than good.

    When people tell me that they have been told that they have a chemical imbalance or some such rubbish, this is what I say.

    Have you ever had a drink? Getting drunk is a chemical imbalance effecting the brain, it effects memory, co-ordination and so on. So… we know what a real chemical imbalance looks and feels like. Your brain is a delicate instrument it barely functions when there is an imbalance. Now I ask, do you remember what I just said? Do you remember what you did yesterday? Can you tell me what you did last week? They say yes of course. Right so this means that your memory is working fine. Do you have emotions? Yes, so your emotions are working fine too. From a mechanics point of view your brain is working well enough.

    Second line of questioning, do you know why you feel depressed? If you have any idea why you may be feeling depressed, then you cannot tell if your problem is “clinical” until after that reason you know about has been resolved, so let us work on that.

    The only qualifications that matters are:

    1. The explanatory power of the scientific understanding gained by studying what is really going on.
    2. The ability to apply those insights to SUCCESSFULLY resolve any issues.

    Consider this, I am claiming that when I sit down with someone to look at an issue in their life, be it a phobia, grief, or trauma due to being gang raped. I know with a high degree of confidence that within two hours the effects of that will be completely healed, 100%. I have repeated this between 1 and 20 times a week for 10 years. Some of the folks that I have witnessed finding healing are so good at this process now, they can get an issue resolved in 30 seconds, whereas when they started years ago it would have taken 2 hours. This week, I witnessed the phobic fear of chiropodists, resolved in 30 seconds.

    So compare my experience, in which I have witnessed one individual has recovered from over 900 individually identified issues including 103 phobias (oops 104 now I forgot the one above!), to that of a doctor who has had a 20 minute appointment and prescribed some pills. It does not even compare.

    What is amazing is that the the guy with the badge is given a high salary and is respected, YET he/she could not even identify and resolve rape trauma in an hour, even if the person came right out with it and said to his face “I was raped”, his reply would be the same, here have some pills, or do you fancy some ECT.

    Every single person that I know who has DID/MPD suffers from re-traumatisation in a hospital environment. There are too many scary people, the food is bad, doctors do not listen, the wards are scary, and may be locked, restraints are still used, medications can be dangerous, or administered against their will, violence and danger abound.

    I know someone who was raped on the ward and abused more than once:
    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-09-21/news/ct-met-psych-hospital-rapes-20100921_1_psychiatric-hospitals-hospital-staff-sexual-abuse

    Ok, so the medical model is wrong. There is a model that is correct. Use it and understand it and you will see success, it is not hard at all. I am working on a course to this effect.

    I look forward to sharing some case studies with you in due course. Today I need to work on developing this course.

    Consider this, how many doctors publish their case studies for you to look at how they work and their levels of success.

    Like

    Reply
    • Hello Keith.

      I am not necessarily saying that you don’t know what you are talking about. You come at mental health care from a religious point of view – I do not.

      I didn’t know you were measuring the effects of your treatment. What have you found? I am interested in reading about what you have accomplished – what is the name of the professional journal that published you? Mental health care providers must be wondering what is going on as you claim “and demonstrate success on a daily basis, success that those you do recognise can only dream about.”

      I do not think that the Western view of psychiatry and psychology is the only and right way to treat patients. What I am seeking is that those dispensing any kind of mental health care and/or guidance disclose & inform patients/clients about the treatment in which they are about to embark. Secondly, if any treatment has a track record of causing death, disability, or disfigurement (ex cutting or suicide attempts) it needs to be reported & documented Somewhere for the public to find.

      You report that your clients do Not want professional mental health care providers near them – I fully understand that feeling. I agree that the medical model is in sore need of revamping and setting of standards that are reinforced. So, Keith, we have a lot more in common than you realize.

      Regarding what I may remember from last week. Your point is valid. What you are not mentioning the holes that are in our memories. If any of were to reconstruct last week, we would need a calendar of events to do so accurately or we would need someone else to help us remember. For example a friend might say: remember we went to get ice cream on Tuesday nite? Having holes or gaps in our memory is normal for the human brain because we do not remember everything we experienced nor can we recall accurately. If we add the element of time into the equation, the further we get from the event – the less we remember.

      I disagree about having “to cannot tell if your problem is “clinical” until after that reason you know about has been resolved, do.” I agree with the medical profession that many psychiatric issues that are experienced can be addressed biologically. DID is Not one of them as history and lack of evidence shows.

      There is no dispute in my mind or experience that indicates that hospitalization for MPD/DID has much to offer in the way of “success” and for sure retraumazation occurs. I’m with you on that one, Keith.

      We do not hear enough “success” stories regarding mental health care. First we would need to agree on the definition of success before we could measure and report it. Subjective “clinical research” is nothing more than someone’s opinion which is Not free of bias.

      Thank you, Keith for the conversation and the challenges that you present. I am finding that we have much in common. I am most interested in reading about your successes.

      Best, Jeanette

      p.s. It would be helpful to know what some of the standards for treatment are in the UK. You and I are coming at this discussion from different cultural-perspectives which may be contributing to my misunderstanding of psychiatric treatment in your country.

      Like

      Reply
  2. Hi Bertha, I hang out at http://www.blogtv.com/People/keith1y

    you would be most welcome.

    Keith

    Like

    Reply
    • Perfect, thank you for the link to your online TV show Keith.

      Because we hold opposing views & opinions on the subject of whether or not multiple personalities are real, that does not make the leap to me not respecting you as a person.

      As you remember, Keith, you have been at this blog before and criticized for your behavior with “patients” that is, women who come to you for psychiatric help & religious guidance. Unfortunately, you disappear each time. But you are back and that is what matters. Thank you.

      I reiterate what I’ve said before: I think it is dangerous for anyone with no mental health training to be working with people with obvious mental and psychiatric disturbances as those you work with demonstrate. Relying on the deductive reasoning of the engineering degree you hold could very well assist your comprehension yet it offers no insight into psychiatric illnesses and possible causes for them.

      Some cultures support spirit possession but I am not aware that the general thinking of Western cultures does. It doesn’t matter. You do and those who come to you for assistance do. I suppose that if these people leave your presence free of mental torture, you have a point. I remain concerned that caregivers without psychiatric training are equipped to treat someone in the event that their condition becomes a crisis.

      I understand the reasoning of people wanting nothing to do with professionals in the psychiatric profession. Thing is, psychiatry offers much when we look at the biological side of mental disturbances. I wonder how many of your clients would benefit from medical intervention to alleviate & manage their distress? Do you provide clients with information regarding a biological basis for their distress?

      Best.

      Like

      Reply
      • HI Jeanette,

        I agree we do have a lot more in common that we often acknowledge. This is one reason why I keep returning here once in a while. I detect space for dialogue.

        I thought I would let you know how things work in the UK. I thought things were better in the USA, but yesterday I was talking with someone who has suffered unimaginably in the US system, so now I am not so sure.

        I wrote some stuff up here:
        http://www.safeprayer.com/Articles/The%20UK%20NHS%20System.html

        best regards

        Keith

        Like

        Reply
        • Thanks, Keith. Will give it a look.

          Like

          Reply
        • Hi Keith,

          You paint a grim picture of mental health care in the UK. What about the biological basis of some mental illnesses. Do you not think that a drug intervention will, or can, relieve symptoms making life manageable for patients?

          The long wait time for patients to get treatment is most unfortunate. I can see why you are offering an alternative place to obtain treatment in spite of the fact that you do not employ psychiatric professionals.

          I am wondering about something you said about hospitalization. You stated that unless a person is a threat to themselves or others they won’t be hospitalized. Under what conditions do you think someone would need hospitalization.

          Thank you for giving us a glimpse of the mental health system in the UK. Americans often think the mental health system stinks here, but compared to the US, we are moving along more quickly in getting patients care.

          What is being done in the UK to improve mental health care and make it more assessable more quickly? I dare to think how it is for people needing acute care.

          Like

          Reply
          • > Hi Keith,
            > You paint a grim picture of mental health care in the UK.

            Thanks. It is a shame.

            However I do have a plan. I believe that the answer requires the power to be moved from the psychiatrist to be given to the patient and their immediate supporters, enabling them to harness collaboratively the expertise of many different people in establishing a diagnosis based upon their intervention needs. From there the patient may then subscribe to the interventions and services they need via their GP.

            > What about the biological basis of some mental illnesses.

            Logically there can be no biological basis for any mental illness, UNTIL after you have systematically and rigorously discounted all “trauma based”, “nurture” and “environmental” factors. I have identified 12 distinct categories of these as a working model.

            Each of the 12 categories is a research field of its own, and some are more easily understood and addressed than others. Only 6 can be addressed through therapy and interventions, the other 6 require an ongoing support in an intentional therapeutic community or family setting. (which isn’t readily available on the NHS)

            So there is a lot of work to do eliminating the probable causes, before reaching the illogical conclusion that there is a biological basis for mental illness.

            I assert that if emotions happen and memory is half functioning then the brain is ok. When something is genuinely wrong with the brain it tends to be obvious, (e.g. fits) and it is obviously nothing to do with mental illness e.g. Alzeimers has a biological basis as far as I am aware.

            > Do you not think that a drug intervention will, or can, relieve symptoms making life manageable
            > for patients?

            Perhaps temporarily, but it is playing with fire, its a very dangerous game. There is a real danger of causing a chemical imbalance as the brain compensates. (Peter Breggin – Toxic Psychiatry) To effect trauma resolution you need raw honesty and raw emotions, you want everything working at full raw capacity. Any medications should be mild, non-mind altering, non addictive, and on a temporary basis only, like aspirin.

            > The long wait time for patients to get treatment is most unfortunate.

            We don’t have a huge wait time. We do have certain people who exercise a lot of power, based upon very little information and expertise.

            > I can see why you are offering an alternative place to obtain treatment in spite of the fact that
            > you do not employ psychiatric professionals.

            Since many people I help have extensive damage caused by psychiatric professionals, it is best to stay as far away as possible from these “abusers”. This is not easy, given that if anything goes wrong the shrinks are called in by the authorities, and both the GP and benefits officials look to the “abusers” to sign off on anything.

            > I am wondering about something you said about hospitalization. You stated that unless a person
            > is a threat to themselves or others they won’t be hospitalized.

            against their will, under the law.

            Otherwise, voluntary admission to hospital is an option, but the home treatment approach is offered in preference where possible. (cheaper?)

            > Under what conditions do you
            > think someone would need hospitalisation.

            I have handled some fairly tough situations outside of hospital.

            I would like to try and model an alternative to compulsory treatment. Since I do not feel it is right to criticise something without being able to offer a reasoned practical alternative.

            > Thank you for giving us a glimpse of the mental health system in the UK. Americans often think
            > the mental health system stinks here, but compared to the US, we are moving along more
            > quickly in getting patients care.

            I don’t think your system is doing very well to be honest:

            http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-09-21/news/ct-met-psych-hospital-rapes-20100921_1_psychiatric-hospitals-hospital-staff-sexual-abuse

            http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-05-17/health/ct-met-lakeshore-hospital-report-20110517_1_uic-report-dcfs-psychiatric-hospitals

            I have personal reports from a victim who told me that their complaints were filed straight into the round filing cabinet. I hear of admission procedures being abusive and extremely traumatising including strip searches, group therapy being traumatising, of military style draconian treatment. and patients being left for 5 or more hours unsupervised. Believe me I can’t even write 10% of what I have heard.

            > What is being done in the UK to improve mental health care and make it more assessable more
            > quickly? I dare to think how it is for people needing acute care.

            Speed is not the issue.

            The issue is really a philosophical one. Having removed any expectation of genuine recovery or cure. The whole system is stigmatising people with labels and wallowing in maintaining a bunch of people on pills without bothering to see the value of talking to them in depth about the real issues. Real problems get overlooked and methods which actually do work are not noticed, not counted as noteworthy.

            For example, no one in the system has noticed that the person I care for is getting better, let alone inquiring as to why that might be. On the one hand they are not involved enough to see the real issues and the real changes, on the other hand the whole system revolves around drug taking and “are you ok…I’m fine” as an irrelevant measure of well-being.

            regards

            Keith

            Like

          • Hi Keith.

            Appreciate you stopping by again. This time I have more questions than comments – I think.

            First, I’m wondering if the psychology industry in the UK will listen to a plan devised by anyone outside the ole-boys-club. Also, you have an engineering degree and no formal psychiatric training, if I recall correctly. Then again, an outsider could have interesting clinical experiences that could be useful. I doubt that would work in the US.

            I cannot agree that it is illogical to think there is a biological component for mental illness. I agree, however, that the US is over-medicated. When I worked with young adults with psychosis, some of them had a solid family so, do you contend that these patients will be psychotic all their lives due to an environmental factor? In this case, medication only helps manage symptoms.

            If a patient presents with obvious psychosis, how could medical practitioners take the time you suggest to find a root cause? The psychosis is obvious and to withhold treatment would be most cruel to the patient as well as to their families and to mental health care personnel like psych aides and other caregivers. I’ve witnessed this many times.

            Again, this population of patients (psychotic) can rarely be kept at home. Here’s an example of a family I worked with: The male was a young adult of 21 years. He was kept at home for his entire youth and his parents were his main caretakers (both were psychologists). This family had to put locks on all the kitchen cabinets as well as the fridge because he would frequently gulp things like powdered iced tea. He was often violent throwing tantrums where he threw any object nearby and was a threat to all. This particular family lived under these conditions for 21 years and were totally worn out when they surrendered him to a private, mental health treatment center where I was employed.

            The population of mentally distressed people you work with do not fit the scenario above and perhaps you can offer the time and attention to delve into reasons for their illness.

            I can backup what you say about maltreatment and trauma that occurs during therapy – for that one, I have personal experience. It’s criminal.

            Keith, my bottom line is this. if patients are getting better at your facility, you must be doing something right. If their lives improve they, too, must be doing something right whether or not I agree to your methods.

            Best.

            Like

  3. Jeanette I disagree with your assertion that that would be called spirit possession. I am familiar with both, they are very different.

    Keith

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    Reply
    • Perhaps you might get more familiar with them, Keith. Look at history & culture-based illness & phenomenon – tells all.

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      • Jeanette,

        I do a public tv show online, and this is one common event which occurred last week:

        an: I HAVE HER
        an: HAHAHAH
        an: I WILL KILL HER
        an: I HAVE HER THROAT
        an: I I WILL KIL HER
        an: HHAA
        an: I AM ABOUT TO SLIT HER WIST: THAT FAT **** WIL DIE

        I encounter demonic spirits almost every day. I understand what is going on and filter it through my engineering/scientific background.

        See the above event, consider this, I have (on record) had that very same type of conversation occur through 4 individuals simultaneously, and separately. Three of the individuals, all of which I knew, they were not trolls) were pregnant and the spirits were threatening to kill the babies.

        Unlike the hollywood representation of spirits being uncommon big and nasty, in reality they are small and numerous. The spirits are real enough, and are trivially easy to deal with and remove. They can only use an individual’s existing hurts and weaknesses. Thus after the hurts are healed the spirits can no longer effect them.

        The medical model has no framework for understanding anything spiritual, which helps to explain why they are not very good at helping people really. In 20 years of helping people, it has been my understanding of spiritual matters which has made all the difference. 12 years ago we started to see actual repeatable success, and in that time I have witnessed every mental health condition that I know of healed by applying detailed technical understanding of what happened and how it effected that individual. Pure cause and effect. The presence of spirits is a mere trifle, on top, like a big flag saying “the problem is over here”.

        I do not expect you to appreciate or respect what I write here. I hope that in the future you will be willing to review my training courses that I am working on.

        regards

        Keith

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        Reply
  4. whoa, now that is dangerous.

    Creating distinct groups of new memories, while in an altered state of consciousness (in this case hypnotically induced), in which the main person is not consciously aware, is wait for it… dissociation.

    How to make things worse, AVOID!!

    Keith

    Like

    Reply
  5. Jessica

     /  05/23/2012

    wow, shes not even a trained therapist shes a tantric and massage therapist.

    Like

    Reply

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