Harrison G. Pope, MD, Testifies in Repressed Memory in Child Molestation Lawsuit

Friday, July 13, 2012
Psychiatrist testifies on repressed memory in child molestation lawsuit

By Lee Hammel TELEGRAM & GAZETTE STAFF

University of Massachusetts Medical School, Wo...

University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA; Aaron Lazare Medical Research Building, front. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

WORCESTER, Massachusetts, USA – A defense expert. testified … in U.S. District Court that “there is no satisfactory scientific evidence that you could lock up a memory of a major traumatic event” and not remember it again.

Harrison G. Pope, a clinical psychiatrist and professor at Harvard Medical School, testified for Richard B. Edison, a plastic surgeon who is being sued by Timothy Clark …alleges that the doctor sexually abused him for several years, beginning in 1974, when the doctor was a student at University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Mr. Clark was a 10 year old …

Mr. Clark returned to the witness stand today to say that he had no memory of his sexual abuse in the 70s until he visited his mother’s grave in 2008.

Retrieved 07/24/12. Full Story http://www.telegram.com/article/20120713/NEWS/120719752/1116/mobile&TEMPLATE=MOBILE

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5 Comments

  1. Jeanette Bartha said “It would serve us well to learn about different types of memories and the process of memory storage, retention and retrieval.”

    Well your won’t get the straight poop on that out of psychology. https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/104137305374302309388/albums/6016721937833608465/6016721942309960626

    The fMRI is already demonstrating repression. Something I could already have told you about since I have seen someone do it . . . and then I did it myself. Forced into having to face the reality of repression, some in psychology are now developing a fall back position–all your memories are false.

    Hmmmm . . . what is it they are afraid of?

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  2. J. Bean

     /  07/25/2012

    I hope you’re right, Jeanette. Keep us updated on this case.

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    • It would serve us well to learn about different types of memories and the process of memory storage, retention and retrieval.

      Some memories IMHO, are fragments. Then they can become confabulated i.e. our minds fill in the blanks and poof! we can be led to think a confabulated memory is a recovered memory. It’s a bit of a labyrinth, one worth knowing.

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  3. J. Bean

     /  07/25/2012

    These arguments were heard by a jury?
    The typical juror is not equipped to make determinations on the reliability of scientific evidence. When two experts offer conflicting opinions, the average juror considers it a “wash”. That is why these arguments should be heard in a seperate evidentiary hearing before going to the jury.

    Or was this testimony heard by the judge to determine if the “repressed memory” testimony was reliable enough to be allowed as evidence? If so, what was the decision?

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    • Well, J. Bean. When it comes to issues surrounding the validity of repressed memories, common sense & logical thinking evidently trumps an argument being a “wash” as you put it.

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