DSM-5 Approves New Fad Diagnosis For Child Psychiatry: Antipsychotic Use Likely to Rise by Allen Frances, MD

By Allen Frances, MD | July 22, 2011

The DSM-5 Scientific Review Group was the last hope for an eleventh hour DSM-5 save. This hope recently died. Its first decision makes clear that the group will be no more than an easy rubber stamp willing to approve even the worst ideas dreamed up by the DSM-5 work groups. Its quick acceptance of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD, also known as Temper Dysregulation) shows that just about anything can make it through this sham review process. Watch out for yet another fad sparked by child psychiatry.

Retrieved 7/26/11.Full Story Psychiatric Times

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More controversy surrounding the Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders -5 (DSM).

More proof of the politics & Big Pharma influence on the “bible” of the psychiatric industry.

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11 Comments

  1. Working on pieces on pediatric bipolar disorder now and came upon this piece myself. What’d you think? I find Dr. Allen, editor of the DSM-IV, is always good for some stinging criticism for his followers. I think DMDD might just be worth a try.

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/29/2012

      Hi Candidaabrahamson, thanks for stopping by. Could you tell us what is DMDD?

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      • With pleasure–as best as I can, since the thing’s totally new. It’s Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) and you can find the DSM’s proposed usage of the term at http://www.dsm5.org/proposedrevision/pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=397#. Sounds like it has potential to cover the child with unmanageable mood swings–and those dreadful rages that have led to so many diagnoses of bipolar. I guess time will tell. . .

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        • jeanettebartha

           /  04/29/2012

          Thanks for the link to DMDD. Yes, I recall the first time I saw that. It reminded me of the “bait-and-switch” maneuver that I think changing the name of multiple personality disorder to dissociative identity disorder managed to do. Whenever a diagnosis is questionable, not fully researched, or getting bad press you will find a new name or a spin-off diagnosis.

          What scares me is that that type of behavior shows how the Psychology Industry preys on fearful parents and uses children for reasons unknown to me – that is if one removes the fame and fortune aspect.

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    • jeanettebartha

       /  04/29/2012

      You bring up interesting points on your blog. I am suspect of pediatric bipolar disorder and other diagnoses as you are. Just this morning I read a blog where the writer declares that she has had multiple personalities since age 4 but only learned of them as a teenager… what?

      The USA is too eager to label children and offer drugs as the answer. Too often, USA clinicians and researchers – and then their patients who adore them – say that “other” countries don’t get it rather than further examining their opinions and research results. Many of these mental “illnesses” are culturally defined and found.

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      • Your point about labelling and medicating is particularly interesting in this context, as I wonder what will happen as we move children off the roles of bipolar disorder onto DMDD. Will that lead to fewer meds used to treat the children–or will the new diagnosis demand its own set of pharmaceuticals. And I’m not even opposed to treatment–if it’s thought-through and will actually help–and help more than hinder.
        Excellent point about mental illnesses being culturally defined and found. Reminds me of that article on why French children behave. . .think there will be fewer DMDD diagnoses in France? I’d bet on it.

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        • jeanettebartha

           /  04/29/2012

          I’d bet France will not have a huge spike in bipolar kids too.

          In the US, kids are thought to be too sensitive and easily bruised. It reminds me of athletic competitions and other elementary school activities whereby everyone gets a trophy – not just the kids who actually won the event – god forbid, one child may end up with post traumatic stress disorder and then develop multiple personalities in order to cope.

          What happened to strong kids and the resiliency of the human spirit? Pathology is everywhere.

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          • I see you have a lot of deep thoughts–and good ones–on this. They add to the quality of your blog.

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          • jeanettebartha

             /  05/01/2012

            I appreciate your kind words. From this side of the computer screen, it’s people like you who drive interesting conversations and passion.

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          • And you who allow them not fall flat, with your insights and willingness to speak out!

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          • jeanettebartha

             /  05/05/2012

            Thank you for your kindness and support.

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