Denver, Colorado, USA: Kidnapper Sexually Assualts 8 year-old, Claims he Has Multiple Personaltiies

Aurora, Colorado, USA. Bret Thompson, 29, on trial for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a little girl two years ago, listened to her testimony on Tuesday.

Thompson lured the child to his van by asking her to help him toss rubbish in a dumpster. When she agreed, he grabbed her, and drove off. He took the child to his home and sexually assaulted her.

The girl’s testimony began today and due to her ability to identify her kidnapper in addition to forensic evidence, Thompson was located in New Jersey about 1600 miles (approximately 2574 kilometers) from Colorado on the east coast of the United States just south of New York. He was peacefully sleeping in his van at the time of arrest.

Thompson’s attorney told the court about his client’s sexual abuse as a young boy and described his difficult upbringing in foster care and mental health facilities. Thompson plead not guilty by reason of insanity stating he cannot tell right from wrong due to having Dissociative Identity Disorder, commonly known as multiple personalities.

A short video by Denver, CBS Channel 4

Advertisements
Leave a comment

12 Comments

  1. Rachel D.

     /  03/07/2013

    Hello, Jeanette. New reader here. I’ve been enjoyng the blog, although this post quite apalled me.

    A little off-topic: I’m really curious as to what you think of this otherkin/soulbonding/magic madness, you know what I’m talking about? This werid fringe in the social justice blogosphere filled with people who claim not only to live with systems of other people in their minds but also to share their bodies with animals and even mythical/non-human creatures (!!!).

    Here’s a list of blogs: http://anotherwiki.dreamhart.org/wiki/List_of_Active_Otherkin_Blogs

    The horror, ah the horror…

    Well, do they actually believe this or do you think they are just looking for a way into the social justice movements?

    I’d love to hear your input, thanks!

    Like

    Reply
    • Jeannette Bartha

       /  03/07/2013

      Welcome, Rachael. Thanks for leaving your comments.

      This is new territory for me – the otherkin is it “people” or “movement” or what? I’ll look into it, sounds interesting.

      In the meantime, share your thoughts if you want.

      I’m unsure what you mean are these people looking for a way into the social justice movements?

      My experiences with MPD/DID when I thought I had multiple personalities + the reading I do written by people who currently believe they have them is that they do not see themselves as a social movement – unless getting together with other “survivor” or other “victims” constitutes a social movement.

      What I find interesting is that when I introduce culture-bound syndromes the concept that MPD/DID is largely contained in the US/Canada/UK/AU. They do not view DID and multiple personalities to be a cultural phenomenon. What I’m told is that it MPD/DID is worldwide and other countries don’t have it because it’s just undiagnosed. Nonsense if you ask me but that’s the argument.

      Like

      Reply
  2. morgan

     /  03/06/2013

    Whether he has DID or not, once he offends, he is not a victim, he is a predator. Predators need to be stopped at any cost. I thing he’s full of you know what about having DID, but lets say hes telling the truth: that makes him MORE dangerous- bc now he feels entirely justified to keep offending seeing himself as a victim.
    There are plenty of people, myself included, who have DID for real and don’t go around offending. It makes me sick to my stomach that this a*hole would be classified in the same category as I am. I am furious.

    Like

    Reply
    • Morgan: “once he offends, he is not a victim, he is a predator” — very well said.

      Like

      Reply
      • Jeannette Bartha

         /  03/06/2013

        Hum is there such a thing as a “victim-predator” or a “predator-victim”? Certainly leaves a lot of interpretation which will play out in court.

        I think there’s too much sympathy for the victim/survivor turned predator. What do you think?

        Like

        Reply
        • Too much sympathy for the victim/survivor turned predator — yes, I agree.

          When I was 4 years old, my parents and I visited a church one Sunday. It was the only time we ever went to that particular church, if I remember correctly. The minister’s entire sermon was a big warning to children to stay away from strangers who offer them candy to get in their car. He kept going on and on about how parents need to tell their children that if someone comes along and offers them a candy bar as a bribe to get them into their car, the child needs to say NO and run home. During his sermon, he kept looking at me, or so it seemed. After the service, he walked up to my parents and said, “You have a very pretty little girl, there. I hope you teach her to stay away from men who offer her candy or any kind of treat or toy.”

          A few days later, I was playing outside in the vacant lot next to our house, when that minister drove up and stopped his car on the edge of the lot. He rolled down his window and held up a Hershey chocolate bar. He told me that he would give me the candy bar if I would just get in his car. I just stared at him, dumbfounded. He was the man who preached on and on about how dangerous it was for a little child to get into someone’s car if they offered a candy bar — and now he was doing the very thing he had preached about! I still remember how confused I felt. Was he testing me, to see if I had paid attention to his sermon? Surely he wouldn’t hurt me, he was the one who had been so concerned about the safety of chidren like me! I really did want that chocolate bar….

          As I was standing there trying to decide what to do, he said: “Don’t be afraid of me. Remember, I am the man of God. I won’t hurt you, I promise. I just want to give you some candy. Come on over here and let me give it to you. You like chocolate, don’t you?”

          I started to take a step toward his car — but something about his smile was too creepy. I turned and ran back to the house, and told my mother what had happened. She said, “I’m really not surprised, I thought he seemed kind of weird.”

          Isn’t that the weirdest thing? Back in those days, you didn’t hear much about child sexual abuse. By “those days,” I mean the 1950s. That happened in 1957 or 58. At 4 years of age, I had no idea what sex was, and until we went to his church and he preached that sermon at me, I don’t believe anyone had ever warned me to not take candy from a man or get in his car. I was taught to OBEY adults, without question. So puzzling… and then my dad became a preacher a couple of years later, and he was just really weird. Not a sexual predator, but violent and weird.

          Sorry, I guess I’m rambling. I just do not understand this stuff. Guess I should be thankful that I don’t.

          Like

          Reply
          • Jeannette Bartha

             /  03/07/2013

            That is an odd occurrence. I wonder what he was doing? Whatever it was, it wasn’t being kind to a little girl under his care.

            On the other hand, he did good by you teaching you not to take candy from a stranger – a very odd way to teach/preach. Double messages – you were one smart little girl too – to run home away from him.

            The little girl who was assaulted in Colorado is quite the witness – being able to describe the man who kidnapped her by remembering what his tattoos looked like.

            Like

          • Wow, how amazing that she had the presence of mind to remember the abuser’s tattoos. My memory wouldn’t have been that precise, I’m sure. All of my life, I have had a knack for remembering events and conversations. Maybe not the precise word-for-word, but close. However, visuals are another matter, particularly when I’m stressed. I was assaulted once when I was 17, and could not describe anything about the perpetrator, other than a very general description.

            Like

    • Jeannette Bartha

       /  03/06/2013

      Identifying oneself as a “victim” is a problem. Many people find it a just way to not be held accountable whether that’s a full realization or not.

      I may not agree that DID is real, but I would be equally angered to be lumped in the same category.

      I’ll follow this case with updates. Hopefully the little girl gets justice and peace for the rest of her life knowing he will be in prison and she doesn’t have to live in fear.

      Like

      Reply
  3. This makes me almost want to scream. That poor little girl. She was abused, she was violated and traumatized, and her abuser needs to be held accountable for what he did to her. Even if there is such a thing as MPD/DID, and even if this abuser does in fact have that disorder, in my opinion that should not make any difference in whether or not he knows right from wrong.

    This is how my dad tried to explain away almost murdering my mother when I was 12: he claimed that another entity or demon or personality “took over” his body, he blacked out, and when he came to, he had no memory of what he had done.

    Knowing my father, I believe that his account may have been true, from his perspective and experience — although God only knows for sure what was going on inside my dad’s head. My father definitely did behave, all throughout my childhood, as though he had more than one distinctive personality living inside him. That may have been only his delusion — again, only God knows. But regardless of what it was, I believe that my father was responsible for the things he did and said, ALL of the time. The question of which “personality” was “in control” at any given moment, should not make any difference. It was still a personality that resided in and manifested through my father’s being; therefore, HE was responsible.

    Like

    Reply
    • Jeannette Bartha

       /  03/06/2013

      Lady, I believe dissociative amnesia and other types of dissociation are real – do we have to take it another level and create personalities? I say no.

      I hope this trial goes in favor of the little girl – what a little hero.

      Like

      Reply
      • I am personally familiar with at least one type of dissociation, and that is the feeling that life is a dream, and nothing is real, including myself. I have had that reaction as a result of extreme trauma. I also went deaf once, briefly, when my father was violently attacking my mother. I thought he had killed her, and I immediately went deaf. But as soon as I realized that my mother was still alive, my hearing came back on. It was like someone flipped a switch inside my brain. I suppose that would be considered a type of dissociation? It was very strange and surreal.

        The mind is amazing. Complex and mysterious. I think we still have a long way to go, to know all there is to know about the human brain and psyche.

        Like

        Reply

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: