Are state medical boards doing enough to protect patients?

Wisconsin state medical board faces scrutiny with few actions against doctors
January 29, 2013 | By
The Wisconsin state medical board is facing criticism that the state fails to discipline doctors who make mistakes, according to a special report by the Wisconsin State Journal.

Wisconsin has one of the lowest rates of physician discipline, with the other low discipline states being Minnesota, South Carolina, Massachusetts and Connecticut, according to Public Citizen data analyzed by the Wisconsin State Journal. Wisconsin has 1.9 actions per 1,000 physicians. …

Public Citizen has long argued the lax state medical boards allow incompetent or dangerous doctors to fly under the radar.

… the state Supreme Court ruled the medical board is supposed to protect the public, deter wrongdoing and rehabilitate doctors–not punish them.

I…the state medical board said it lacks the resources to revoke or suspend medical licenses

For more information:
– see the Wisconsin State Journal article, map data on actions and chart of reprimanded physicians

Retrieved 01-29-13  http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/story/are-state-medical-boards-doing-enough-protect-patients/2013-01-29?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

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8 Comments

  1. Jessica

     /  02/03/2013

    It’s “Theory & Practice of Group Counseling” by Gerald Corey I have to look back into it to find the exact pages. its very based on psychodynamic and a lot of the chapters have so much of his opinion instead of research that i skip over it.

    That does sound interesting because of how jobs are lately i don’t keep a facebook under my real name, i keep it under a character from tv unsure if they would be against that.

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    • Jeannette Bartha

       /  02/03/2013

      You are free to use any name you choose. others do. There are many people from family members to students to researchers there. Lots of resources. Think about it. you can email me @mpddoesnotexist@gmail if you’d like. Best, and thanks for stopping by.

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  2. Jessica

     /  02/02/2013

    I’ve been sitting here all day working on my homework, all of it is based on freud still and its counseling older adults. With that way of thinking its no wonder our system doesn’t support and protect people, when it finds a way to blame everything bad the client thinks as being “transference”

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    • Jeannette Bartha

       /  02/02/2013

      Transference…leads to blaming parents or anything/anyone other than self.

      How did your class go where you were not pleased with what was being taught?

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      • Jessica

         /  02/02/2013

        sadly i am doing my classes this week by correspondence so i was unable to start a debate on it. I really wish i could on my current book which is stating that emperical research is too mechanical and thus no valid…its a book on group theories and since emperical research doesn’t support it as better then individual, it appears to want to spend an entire chapter attacking it and evidence based research.

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        • Jeannette Bartha

           /  02/03/2013

          Jessica if you get a chance – could you give us the title of that book, chapter, whatever you might have time for? We need to address that. Would you be interested in being invited to the new org. False Memory Syndrome Action Network? You only need a FB account. You would be an asset. Thanks for considering. You will have access to lots of info.

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  3. Are state and federal mental health care agencies and organizations doing enough to protect consumers? Are any ‘mainstream’ (as opposed to alternative) national professional mental health associations doing enough to protect consumers? Are all mental health education programs at insitutions of higher learning taking the responsiblity to teach theories that will protect consumers? The answer is a big fat NO. Where are the accreditation boards and committees? Where are the watchdog groups? I think a lot of the problem is related to the economy. There are too many people in who have gotten into the BUSINESS of mental health care, who call themselves therapists, who are trying to make a living, so latch onto whatever way they can without regard to whether or not the method or theories they’re buying into are ethical and based on science and reason. In reality, how WOULD these quasi mental health ‘professionals’ come to learn whether or not something’s ethical when some of the existing mainstream national mental health care professional organizations like the American Psychological Assn, the American Psychiatric Assn, the National Assn of Social Workers, to name a few; state and federal agencies; and, even some institutions of higher learning are unwilling to take a a stand and/or do what’s best for consumers of mental health care? There are simply not enough citizen/consumer watchdog groups helping to police the industy to eliminate the quacks and quackery.

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    • Jeannette Bartha

       /  02/01/2013

      Hello Pat, welcome.

      Pertinent questions — I, for one, have no answers.

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