The Most Dangerous Idea in Mental Health by Ed Cara

USA, Pacific Standard: The Science of Society. November 3, 2014.

Ed Cara Mr. Cara lives in New York City. He writes about the intersection of science and social justice at his blog, Grumbles and Rumbles.

Excerpts:

“The belief that hidden memories can be “recovered” in therapy should have been exorcised years ago, when a rash of false memories dominated the airwaves, tore families apart, and put people on the stand for crimes they didn’t commit. But the mental health establishment does not always learn from its mistakes—and families are still paying the price.

Nearly four years ago, Tom and his ex-wife sent their daughter to an eating-disorder clinic called the Castlewood Treatment Center, outside St. Louis. In her five months there, Anna grew to believe she had recovered memories of a deeply abusive childhood that she had previously banished from her conscious mind.”

Full article retrieved 11-18-14.

I am adding Mr. Cara’s article to my growing list of historical developments of the false memory syndrome craze, repressed memory theories, multiple personality, dissociative identity disorder and others. Society can no longer ignore the fact that some of these treatments began way back in the 1905, and earlier, but they still thrive today – one hundred years later.

The ever growing list of family tragedies stemming from some types of psychotherapies based on pseudoscience that may treat medical disorders with personal beliefs and politics, rather than science, will no longer be ignored on this blog.

The organizations listed below, to my knowledge, have not taken major steps to insist on science-based treatment for people seeking mental health care. These goofy-therapy debacles that were largely ignored by the United States organizations, like the American Psychiatric Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Medical Association and most recently the US backed National Association of Social Workers – who recently offered continuing education credits for attendees of a recent conference on multiple personalities, disguised in my opinion, as a trauma and dissociation conference held in Seattle, Washington, USA, must be include for an accurate history.

Rebirthing Therapy: Candace Newmaker nee Candace Tiarra Elmore, dies in therapy at 10 years-old, a YouTube video

I came across this video while researching. It does not directly connect to Dissociative Identity Disorder, or multiple personalities. It does, however, show how death from fringe therapies happens more often than the psychology industry would have the public know. And, it reminds me of my friends who were treated for multiple personalities and died during treatment.

I attended the trials of the therapists who murdered 10-year-old Candace during a rebirthing session meant to bond her to Jean Newmaker, her adoptive mother. This YouTube video shows the slow torture of Candace during that psychotherapy session that led to her death. Some details I would add:

Jean Newmaker, Candace’s adoptive mother, was head of pediatric nursing at Duke University. Newmaker, however, was unable to assess that Candace was being suffocated during the rebirthing session.

Candace’s birth family (grandparents) attended the trials. I got to know them rather well over the weeks of the trial. They are a loving family. They told me they were hoping that Jean Newmaker, a single woman who had an above average lifestyle compared to their daughter, would give Candace opportunities that they could not. Instead, she killed their grandchild.

After Candace’s death, her birth family took action and were instrumental in getting the practice of rebirthing banned in Colorado where the incident occurred.

The treatment  some patients are subjected to during dissociative identity disorder amounts to torture. When a patient is continually badgered to “remember” their past as a means to heal old wounds, that is torture. When a patient is obviously regressing and getting worse during treatment –  that is torture. When a patient regresses and cannot function after therapy is initiated, is down right medical malpractice.

We must stop this senseless killing and the decline of patients mental stability during psychotherapy.

“YouTube video titled: This is Child Abuse, Not Therapy”

The Millenium Project has more information about the Candace Newmaker murder. Here is a link to where you can find some of the transcript of the session that ended her life after 2 weeks in therapy with Connel Watkins and Julie Ponder.

candace.htm

I remember this conversation that occurred as Candace was struggling to breathe under layers of sofa cushions and tightly wrapped in a flannel sheet. The child screamed, she begged; she pleaded for oxygen; she became silent. Her 10-year-old mind understood the concept of “death” and she accepted her fate after hours of struggling for air. Her last word being “No.”

Jean Newmaker was (and may still be) a pediatric nurse at Duke University. Candace vomited and defecated under the sofa cushions and blanket, yet none of the counselors (there were 4) nor adoptive-mother Newmaker recognized that Candace’s body was shutting down preparing for death.

This was a bone-chilling moment in my life to watch this video.

updated 12-26-14.

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Rebirthing Therapy: Candace Newmaker nee Candace Tiarra Elmore, dies in therapy at 10 years-old, a YouTube video by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
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Psychiatric Nonsense at Noon: “FMSwordF”

My, my, my, I have a rather humorous comment to report on today. If only the commenter, Christopher, read the article below and was outraged that a mental health facility was accumulating medical malpractice suits instead of coining stupid acronyms and failing at insulting me, perhaps a dialogue would have started. Instead, I am dealing rather humorously with Christopher’s lack of education and moral fortitude.

Christopher commented to my post entitled: Treatment Facility, Mercy Ministries: Harm Continues to Women Patients? The post was to update readers that there is a 4th medical malpractice suit filed against this organization and those who run it. But I digress.

Christopher came to this blog intending to be obnoxious and condescending to me, but instead only managed to tickle my funny bone. Christopher didn’t mean to be humorous, but heck, when something’s funny, I’m gonna laugh – and share.

Uneducated and vindictive commenters like Christopher seem like disgruntled pseudo-survivors who are more interested in attacking me instead of the issues I report on. Choosing to demean me (which never works) rather than discussing what is going on at Mercy Ministries 4th medical malpractice suit is pathetic and glaringly shows that pseudo-survivors are not interested in safe and effective mental health care.

Back to Christopher. Trying  to coin a new phrase instead of working to make mental-health care safe and affordable – while simultaneously thinking my heart will break at personal insults, is deplorable. But heck, you have to give ’em “The Psychiatric Nonsense at Noon Brown-Banana Award” for trying. Christopher’s new phrase is: FMSwordF.  Mean anything to you? Of course not. I, on the other hand, am an accomplished fencer with real swords resting here and there around the house, so what I saw was the word “sword” smack dag in the middle of FMSwordF.  Nah, I told myself, this isn’t a cute fencing term so I read on.

Christopher came here intending to trash the False Memory Syndrome Foundation (FMSF), but didn’t want to write out the full acronym of the organization because s/he claims there is no such “thing” as false memory syndrome. OK, fine with me if Christopher wants to make a point (I’d be careful though because there are real swords about 6 feet from where I’m sitting and they have real points) but I digress. FMS is a well established term meaning “false memory syndrome” used to describe remembering an event that, in reality, never occurred. It’s been used for decades. Most people familiar with the term FMS know it is not a syndrome per se but that didn’t prevent Christopher from trying one more time – to make a lame point.

Well, well, well. What did Christopher accomplish with the FMSwordF mumbo-jumbo-nonsense besides winning a blog post dedicated to the absurdity they spouted?

The post, see below, is about the harm sustained by patients at this particular facility. Hey Christopher, what do you think about Mercy Ministries?

Article here

Comment below:

Christopher’s comment: Submitted on 2014/11/10 at 12:03 PM

“It is evident that your inability to harmonize and process your own past experiences is what drives this very bizarre conspiracy theory-driven vendetta against those with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Your personal experience is not a valid foundation on which to launch projections onto the different and individual experiences of others. Perhaps you ought find a more productive pasttime [sic]than passing your days seeking to unearth further means of discrediting and undermining a group of people you are openly and admittedly not a part of.

I will also point out that the vast majority of your “supporters” are emotionally-lax women who openly profess issues with their purportedly dissociative mother; hardly an objective point of reference. Best of luck sorting yourself out.”

“`

p.s. Christopher, dear, what is “emotionaly-lax women”? Harmonize and process? Does that have something to do with digesting my brown bag lunch? What is “purportedly dissociative mother”. What does offering me “luck sorting yourself out” mean? I have supporters? Wow, thanks for the kudos!

You can count on me Always being here to report on mental health practices that harm, or have the potential to harm, patients and their families. Just one of those irritating facts of life

If you want to know who the blogger is behind the hilarious “FMswordF Brown Bag Brown Banana Award , good luck. I was banned from a comment immediately. So, dear public, if you have a cause to take up, surely this one led by a nameless person telling you nothing about it, toss your money out the window – where I can catch it on the way down.

Cheers!

Creative Commons License
Psychiatric Nonsense at Noon: “FMSwordF” by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.mentalhealthmatters2.wordpress.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at www.mentalhealthmatters2.wordpress.com.

Helen: Woman with 7 Personalities, Part 2 (YouTube)

Running Time: 15:01

This video includes interviews with:

Dr. Larry Culliford, psychiatrist, Royal College of Psychiatrists

Dr. Joan Coleman, psychiatrist who works with ritually & satanically abused people.

Overview:

  • Helen and her friend visit a former teacher
  • It is reveled that Helen is a recovering alcoholic
  • Overt eye blinking to indicate personality change & display of child personalities and baby talk
  • Reveled that Helen cannot hold a job, is living in a counseling flat (public housing) and survives on benefits
  • Shows piles of pills & bottles of medicines that Helen consumes including: sleeping pills, anti-psychotics, antidepressants, central nervous system depressant – Valium, and many over the counter products to quell the side-effects of these pharmaceutical drugs
  • Minute 5:20 Helen states she overdosed on pills over 100 times

Her friend continues the quest to find out what is causing Helen so much pain.

  • Minute 9:20 Helen claims she was “severely abused as a child”
  •           10: 39 Dr. Larry Culliford interview

The quest to find who is responsible for Helen’s condition

  • Minute 13:30 ritual and satanic ritual abuse introduced
  •             13:51 Dr. Joan Coleman interview

Retrieved  10/07/11. YouTube: Woman with 7 personalities Part 2

Conference: International Association for the Study of Trauma & Dissociation

Another conference on discovering and treating multiple personalities. Don’t be fooled by the name change. This is the same organization that was founded to investigate the phenomenon of multiple personalities in the mid-1980s that, according to lawsuits, led to patient harm, familial alienation, and wrongful convictions based on recovered memories of abuse. This group of practitioners and interested parties is probably the only organization of “experts” in psychiatry and psychology that has seen the highest number of medical malpractice lawsuits, medical license revocation, and questionable associations with online degree programs.

I will have reports from the conference when they are available.

~~~~~~~~~~

“Exploring and Learning Together:

What We Now Know about Trauma & Dissociation”

October 23-27 || Westin Long Beach || 333 East Ocean Boulevard
Long Beach || California 90802 || United States 

2014 Plenary Speakers

Constance J. Dalenberg, PhD
Alliant International University
Past-President, Division 56 (Trauma Psychology) of the American Psychological Association
Topic: Countertransference and Transference Crises in Working with Traumatized Patients

Jennifer J. Freyd, PhD
University of Oregon
Editor of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation
Topic: Institutional Betrayal

Gail S. Goodman, PhD
University of California
President, Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association
Topic:  Trauma & Memory in Children and Adolescents

Rick Goodwin, MSW, RSW
Steve LePore
, 1in6 Founder and Executive Director

Topic:  Strength & Courage; Addressing Men’s Experiences of Childhood Sexual Abuse


Therese Clemens, ISSTD Executive Director at tclemens@isst-d.org.

The ISSTD Conference Committee

Kevin J. Connors, MS, MFT, Chair
Therese Clemens, Executive Director ISSTD
Lynette Danylchuk, PhD
Philip J. Kinsler, PhD, ex officio
Christa Kruger, MD
Christine Forner, MA, MSW
Florence Hannigan, MA, BSW
Mara Katz, LCSW
Kathy Steele, MN, CS
Vedat Şar, MD
Joan Turkus, MD

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