The Most Dangerous Idea in Mental Health by Ed Cara

USA, Pacific Standard: The Science of Society. November 3, 2014.

Ed Cara Mr. Cara lives in New York City. He writes about the intersection of science and social justice at his blog, Grumbles and Rumbles.

Excerpts:

“The belief that hidden memories can be “recovered” in therapy should have been exorcised years ago, when a rash of false memories dominated the airwaves, tore families apart, and put people on the stand for crimes they didn’t commit. But the mental health establishment does not always learn from its mistakes—and families are still paying the price.

Nearly four years ago, Tom and his ex-wife sent their daughter to an eating-disorder clinic called the Castlewood Treatment Center, outside St. Louis. In her five months there, Anna grew to believe she had recovered memories of a deeply abusive childhood that she had previously banished from her conscious mind.”

Full article retrieved 11-18-14.

I am adding Mr. Cara’s article to my growing list of historical developments of the false memory syndrome craze, repressed memory theories, multiple personality, dissociative identity disorder and others. Society can no longer ignore the fact that some of these treatments began way back in the 1905, and earlier, but they still thrive today – one hundred years later.

The ever growing list of family tragedies stemming from some types of psychotherapies based on pseudoscience that may treat medical disorders with personal beliefs and politics, rather than science, will no longer be ignored on this blog.

The organizations listed below, to my knowledge, have not taken major steps to insist on science-based treatment for people seeking mental health care. These goofy-therapy debacles that were largely ignored by the United States organizations, like the American Psychiatric Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Medical Association and most recently the US backed National Association of Social Workers – who recently offered continuing education credits for attendees of a recent conference on multiple personalities, disguised in my opinion, as a trauma and dissociation conference held in Seattle, Washington, USA, must be include for an accurate history.

Ticker Tape: Questioning D.I.D. & Multiple Personalities

This post will list psychotherapeutic treatments that leave me with questions about its use, scientific validity, and simple evidence that it works.

Psychotherapy for D.I.D., popularly known as multiple personalities, was debunked by the scientific community decades ago, yet the links below will leave you wondering if professional psychotherapists have learned anything from the debacle of the lucrative business of finding, then treating, alter personalities.

Psychotherapy is like any other health care, you are purchasing a service. I hope the links below help you check out treatments available before you choose to purchase any.

porkins-policy-radio-episode-166-satan-goes-to-the-mind-control-convention-with-joseph-flatley/?fbclid=IwAR2QJY9I9iYy1-02IIaI2LOYjpbfdEAyANBNhxFB79W7ruMqNX-kORg4PzkSatan

What it’s Like to Live with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), MedCircle, 07-08-18

 Is Trisha Paytas Exploiting Mental Illness for Viewership?

 

 

 

 

 

Psychiatric Nonsense at Noon: “FMSwordF”

My, my, my, I have a rather humorous comment to report on today. If only the commenter, Christopher, read the article below and was outraged that a mental health facility was accumulating medical malpractice suits instead of coining stupid acronyms and failing at insulting me, perhaps a dialogue would have started. Instead, I am dealing rather humorously with Christopher’s lack of education and moral fortitude.

Christopher commented to my post entitled: Treatment Facility, Mercy Ministries: Harm Continues to Women Patients? The post was to update readers that there is a 4th medical malpractice suit filed against this organization and those who run it. But I digress.

Christopher came to this blog intending to be obnoxious and condescending to me, but instead only managed to tickle my funny bone. Christopher didn’t mean to be humorous, but heck, when something’s funny, I’m gonna laugh – and share.

Uneducated and vindictive commenters like Christopher seem like disgruntled pseudo-survivors who are more interested in attacking me instead of the issues I report on. Choosing to demean me (which never works) rather than discussing what is going on at Mercy Ministries 4th medical malpractice suit is pathetic and glaringly shows that pseudo-survivors are not interested in safe and effective mental health care.

Back to Christopher. Trying  to coin a new phrase instead of working to make mental-health care safe and affordable – while simultaneously thinking my heart will break at personal insults, is deplorable. But heck, you have to give ’em “The Psychiatric Nonsense at Noon Brown-Banana Award” for trying. Christopher’s new phrase is: FMSwordF.  Mean anything to you? Of course not. I, on the other hand, am an accomplished fencer with real swords resting here and there around the house, so what I saw was the word “sword” smack dag in the middle of FMSwordF.  Nah, I told myself, this isn’t a cute fencing term so I read on.

Christopher came here intending to trash the False Memory Syndrome Foundation (FMSF), but didn’t want to write out the full acronym of the organization because s/he claims there is no such “thing” as false memory syndrome. OK, fine with me if Christopher wants to make a point (I’d be careful though because there are real swords about 6 feet from where I’m sitting and they have real points) but I digress. FMS is a well established term meaning “false memory syndrome” used to describe remembering an event that, in reality, never occurred. It’s been used for decades. Most people familiar with the term FMS know it is not a syndrome per se but that didn’t prevent Christopher from trying one more time – to make a lame point.

Well, well, well. What did Christopher accomplish with the FMSwordF mumbo-jumbo-nonsense besides winning a blog post dedicated to the absurdity they spouted?

The post, see below, is about the harm sustained by patients at this particular facility. Hey Christopher, what do you think about Mercy Ministries?

Article here

Comment below:

Christopher’s comment: Submitted on 2014/11/10 at 12:03 PM

“It is evident that your inability to harmonize and process your own past experiences is what drives this very bizarre conspiracy theory-driven vendetta against those with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Your personal experience is not a valid foundation on which to launch projections onto the different and individual experiences of others. Perhaps you ought find a more productive pasttime [sic]than passing your days seeking to unearth further means of discrediting and undermining a group of people you are openly and admittedly not a part of.

I will also point out that the vast majority of your “supporters” are emotionally-lax women who openly profess issues with their purportedly dissociative mother; hardly an objective point of reference. Best of luck sorting yourself out.”

“`

p.s. Christopher, dear, what is “emotionaly-lax women”? Harmonize and process? Does that have something to do with digesting my brown bag lunch? What is “purportedly dissociative mother”. What does offering me “luck sorting yourself out” mean? I have supporters? Wow, thanks for the kudos!

You can count on me Always being here to report on mental health practices that harm, or have the potential to harm, patients and their families. Just one of those irritating facts of life

If you want to know who the blogger is behind the hilarious “FMswordF Brown Bag Brown Banana Award , good luck. I was banned from a comment immediately. So, dear public, if you have a cause to take up, surely this one led by a nameless person telling you nothing about it, toss your money out the window – where I can catch it on the way down.

Cheers!

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Psychiatric Nonsense at Noon: “FMSwordF” by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
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The Failure of Evangelical Mental Health Care: Treatments That Harm Women, Lgbt Persons and the Mentally Ill

By John Weaver

Release date: November 30, 2014

From Amazon:

In the evangelical community, a variety of alternative mental health treatments – deliverance/exorcism, biblical counseling, reparative therapy and many others – have been proposed for the treatment of mentally ill, female and LGBT evangelicals. This book traces the history of these methods, focusing on the major proponents of each therapeutic system while also examining mainstream evangelical psychology. The author concludes that in the majority of cases mental disorders are blamed on two main issues – demonic possession and sin – and that as a result some communities have become a mental health underclass who are ill-served or oppressed by both alternative and mainstream evangelical therapeutic systems. He argues that the only recourse left for mentally ill, female and LGBT evangelicals is to rally for reform and increased accountability for both professional and alternative evangelical practitioners.

retrieved 10-22-14

The Failure of Evangelical Mental Health Care: Treatments That Harm Women, Lgbt Persons and the Mentally Ill

 

Mercy Ministries Admits Misrepresentation: Repays Clients $120,000

Charity admits cheating women

Anne-Louise Brown | 19th December 2009 2:50 AM

“CHRISTIAN charity Mercy Ministries, which ran a home for young women in need on the Sunshine Coast, has admitted to false, misleading and deceptive conduct.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission said the Sydney-based group, had apologized for misrepresenting its services and repaid about $120,000 to affected women.

The charity ran two homes for troubled young women – at Glenview on the Coast and in Sydney.

Both homes have closed. The Glenview centre shut its doors last July amid controversy.

ACCC chairman Graeme Samuel said Mercy Ministries had advertised its services as free, but then asked residents to sign over their Centrelink payments in return for treatment. …

…“Also, Mercy Ministries misrepresented that it offered professional support from qualified specialists when in fact that was not the case.”Last year, the group became embroiled in a national controversy when three girls who had gone through the program, including two on the Sunshine Coast, went public with their claims of mistreatment.

They alleged the six-month programs had left them suicidal.

Retrieved 03/15/12. Charity Admits Cheating Women

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