The therapeutic value of adolescents’ blogging about social–emotional difficulties by Meyran Boniel-Nissim & Azy Barak

I’ve blogged about the use of the Internet to obtain information on mental health issues by teens with an unfavorable opinion. I continue to find it potentially dangerous for adolescents to publish diaries on the Internet even though short-term support can easily be found. It is all to easy to find information on mental illnesses and particularly people who believe they have multiple personalities. Usually, when someone publishes a blog or post in a forum claiming to be a teen questioning whether they have multiple personalities, they are flooded with supportive and caring opinions in favor of their questions. There is rarely anyone who takes the time to challenge what the teen is asking about.

Maybe the researchers below, favoring the use of the Internet for journaling as a practical therapeutic endeavor, will create new clients after adolescents learn that publishing personal thoughts and feelings for the world to read is not a good idea. Commiserating with people who believe they have multiple personalities is a sure way to develop them, in many cases.

~~~

The therapeutic value of adolescents’ blogging about social–emotional difficulties.

Boniel-Nissim, Meyran; Barak, Azy

Psychological Services, Dec 12, 2011, doi: 10.1037/a0026664

Abstract

Research shows that writing a personal diary is a valuable therapeutic means for relieving emotional distress and promoting well-being, and that diary writing during adolescence helps in coping with developmental challenges.

Current technologies and cultural trends make it possible and normative to publish personal diaries on the Internet through blogs—interactive, online forms of the traditional personal diary. We examined the therapeutic value of blogging for adolescents who experience social–emotional difficulties.

The field experiment included randomly assigned adolescents, preassessed as having social–emotional difficulties, to 6 groups (26–28 participants in each): Four groups were assigned to blogging (writing about their difficulties or free writing; either open or closed to responses), a group assigned to writing a diary on personal computers, and a no-treatment control group. Participants in the 5 writing groups were instructed to post messages at least twice a week over 10 weeks. Outcome measures included scales of social–emotional difficulties and self-esteem, a social activities checklist, and textual analyses of participants’ posts. Measurement took place at pre- and postintervention and at follow-up 2 months later.

Results showed that participants maintaining a blog significantly improved on all measures. Participants writing about their difficulties in blogs open to responses gained the most. These results were consistent in the follow-up evaluation. ( (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)

* formatting and bold type by blogger

updated 04-11-15

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The Illusive Satanists: What Many in the Multiple Personality Community Believe about Satanic Ritual Abuse

Mr. Satan Head

Mr. Satan Head (Photo credit: Scott Beale)

Last year, at Halloween, I designed a costume and attended Kate’s annual
party. She decorated her property, starting at the curb, with blinking orange
lights, cob webs, and hidden boxes that made unpredictable sounds when I
walked by. The house was dark with intrigue. I wondered what scary characters
awaited my arrival.

After dark, her neighborhood was full of adults and children in costume. We
pretended to be witches or walking trees or scarecrows. We gave ourselves
permission to create, fantasize, and play. For one night, we became someone,
or something, other than ourselves. Mystery and intrigue are what make Kate’s
Halloween parties enticing.

Oddly, treatment for Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), now known as Dissociative
Identity Disorder (DID), has similar enticing qualities. For example, once
labeled a “multiple,” I was often viewed as exotic and mysterious. My thought
patterns and subsequent behaviors were intriguing and bewildering to therapists.
Treatment twisted my thinking. I became a devoted student of repressed memory
therapy
, believing I was raised in a Satanic cult. Therapy helped me “remember”
cult meetings with gory smoldering cauldrons of blood, dismembered animals,
the screech of tormented women, and the foul smell of burning flesh. The
Halloween season, once a time of fun and theatrics, became an annual nightmare
referred to as “The Satanic High Holidays.” Therapy transformed the play of yesteryear into terror.
The Halloween season became life-threatening. My doctor instructed me to
beware of encoded messages sent by Satanists, either by mail or by telephone,
programming me to suicide. He said I needed protection from them because I was
exposing their cult secrets. I agreed to be hospitalized, drugged and
quarantined.

My doctor’s thinking was not logical. In fact, it was pure nonsense. The
tricks, illusions, and deceits of treatment lured me in.

What made it impossible to distinguish fact from fancy? Prior to therapy, I
knew nothing about Satanism. While hospitalized, however, I was inundated with
information about Satanic cults from my doctor, therapists, nurses, other
patients, self- proclaimed “professionals” who survived Satanic abuse, and books.
Initially, I was a willing participant in the exchange of information. Later,
I was a captive audience and my caretakers’ professional opinions quickly
flipped my belief system upside-down.

I often proclaimed that my uncovered “memories” were fabrications, but I was
ignored. New “memories” weren’t as real as those I’d never forgotten; they
were dream-like and fuzzy. The idolatrous manner in which I related to my
doctor blinded me to the truth regarding my history. I was tricked into
believing there was Satanic abuse when, in fact, there wasn’t.

The illusive Satanists never surfaced at Halloween. Just the same, my feelings
of terror were real. Therapy created panic, insomnia, anorexia, abuse of
prescription drugs, gastrointestinal distress and fatigue. My behavior was
irrational. I hid under the bed, shrouded myself in blankets, and hugged
Leroy, my teddy bear.

Unknowingly, I was caught in the web of my doctor’s delusions. Halloween is
payday for some therapists and hospitals because clients are often in a
heightened emotional state. The fabricated Halloween horrors create chaos;
they breed confusion and anxiety. Clients seek comfort and often require extra
with therapists while needing more prescription drugs,additional phone contact,                                               and even hospitalization.

I challenge therapists who treat clients for Satanic abuse to follow their own treatment regime this year. By mid-October, check into a hospital, stay behind locked doors, speak to no one, ingest mass quantities of narcotics, and starve yourselves — then stay awake while watching horror movies night and day.

Since leaving treatment I learned the illusive Satanists, created in therapy, don’t exist. Halloween has returned to what it’s always been — a day of fun, fantasy, and theater. I’m looking forward to Kate’s party.

~~~~~~~~~~

Originally published in the False Memory Syndrome Foundation Newsletter,
October, 1999

Apologies for the formatting. The original article does not translate well.

Creative Commons License
The Illusive Satanists by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at www.mentalhealthmatters2.wordpress.com.
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Protected by Copyscape Online Plagiarism Test

Reposted 10-23-18

Helen: Woman with 7 Personalities, Part 2 (YouTube)

Running Time: 15:01

This video includes interviews with:

Dr. Larry Culliford, psychiatrist, Royal College of Psychiatrists

Dr. Joan Coleman, psychiatrist who works with ritually & satanically abused people.

Overview:

  • Helen and her friend visit a former teacher
  • It is reveled that Helen is a recovering alcoholic
  • Overt eye blinking to indicate personality change & display of child personalities and baby talk
  • Reveled that Helen cannot hold a job, is living in a counseling flat (public housing) and survives on benefits
  • Shows piles of pills & bottles of medicines that Helen consumes including: sleeping pills, anti-psychotics, antidepressants, central nervous system depressant – Valium, and many over the counter products to quell the side-effects of these pharmaceutical drugs
  • Minute 5:20 Helen states she overdosed on pills over 100 times

Her friend continues the quest to find out what is causing Helen so much pain.

  • Minute 9:20 Helen claims she was “severely abused as a child”
  •           10: 39 Dr. Larry Culliford interview

The quest to find who is responsible for Helen’s condition

  • Minute 13:30 ritual and satanic ritual abuse introduced
  •             13:51 Dr. Joan Coleman interview

Retrieved  10/07/11. YouTube: Woman with 7 personalities Part 2

Satanic Ritual Abuse Calendar of Events for Dissociative Identity Disorder Patients

Spoiler Alert! The information below is ridiculous and has no business in a psychotherapy room where women are allegedly being treated for multiple personalities.

During my treatment to recall childhood sexual abuse that eventually proved to have never happened, I was coerced into believing I was raised in a satanic cult. My former doctor gave me a satanic calendar similar to the one below but it was more detailed and had many more events scheduled throughout the year. This one lists dates of interest by month and day and states the reason for the celebration or “fear” inducing events that are meant to occur.

This is not only questionable information, but a psychiatrist has no business giving this to a vulnerable patient – or any patient for that matter, IMO.

After receiving a satanic calendar, I became more frantic – especially before the dates listed. The document was the doctor’s way of proving that satanic ritual abuse (SRA) is real and that he would protect me from the evil villains – which by the way, never surfaced. Nonetheless, he admitted me to the hospital and kept me sequestered until the holiday passed.

~ From the 1st National Con­fer­ence on Cult & Rit­ual Abuse Boston, MA, June 1991 ~

Date Cel­e­bra­tion Usage Age
Jan 7 St. Winebald Ani­mal or human (dismemberment) 15–33
M if human
Jan 17 *Satanic Revel Oral, anal, vagi­nal activity 7–17 F
Feb 2 *Satanic Revel Oral, anal, vagi­nal activity 7–17 F
Feb 25 St. Walpur­gis Day Com­mu­nion w/animal blood & dismemberment Ani­mal
Mar 1 St. Enoch Drink­ing of blood for strength & bondage to demons Any age
Mar 20 **Feast Day
(Spring Equinox)
Oral, anal, vaginal Any age M or F
April 21–26 Prepa­ra­tion for sacrifice
Apr 26 –May 1 *Grand Cli­max Cor­pus de Baahl Ages 1–25 F
June 1 **Feast Day
(Sum­mer Soltice)
Oral, anal, vaginal Any age M or F
July 1 Demon Rev­els Druids sex­ual asso­ci­a­tion w/demons Any age F
Aug 1 *Satanic Rev­els Oral, anal, vaginal 7–17 F
Sept 7 Mar­riage to Beast Satan Sac­ri­fices, Dismemberment Infant-21 F
Sept 20 Mid­night Host Dis­mem­ber­ment bonds placed Infant-21 F
Sept 22 **Feast Day
(Fall Equinox)
Oral, anal, vaginal Any age, M or F, Ani­mal or Human
Oct 29 –Nov 1 *All Hal­lows Eve
(Halloween)
Sex­ual cli­max, asso­ci­a­tion w/demons Any age M or F
Nov 4 Satanic Rev­els Oral, anal, vaginal 7–17 F
Dec 22 **Feast Day
(Win­ter Solstice)
Oral, anal, vaginal Any age, M or F, Ani­mal or Human
Dec 24 Demon Revel High Grand Climax Any age M or F

*Sig­ni­fies most impor­tant hol­i­days
**Sig­ni­fies hol­i­days of lesser sig­nif­i­cance
Rit­u­als may take place the evenings before the hol­i­day
Birth­days cho­sen as date to begin indoc­tri­na­tion into the cult

Open letter to Dr. Phil: “a public mental health menace” (process.org)

updated 10-22-14

Resources available in Sybil Exposed: The Extraordinary Story Behind the Famous Multiple Personality Case

by Debbie Nathan

(blog post by Jeanette Bartha)

Publisher: Free Press, A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., NY, NY, 2011

If multiple personalities, false memories, dissociative identity disorder, human memory, questionable child-abuse recall, false confessions, or repressed memories pique’ your interest, then you likely know about the infamous case of Sybil that splashed the American book market and cinema in the early 1970s.

According to Amazon Book Review, “Sybil Exposed draws from an enormous trail of papers, records, photos, and tapes to unearth the lives and passions of these three women whose story exploded into an epic movement with consequences beyond their wildest dreams. Set across the twentieth century and rooted in a time when few professional roles were available to women, this is a story of corrosive sexism, bold but unchecked ambition, runaway greed, utter human vulnerability, duplicity and shared delusion, shaky theories of psychoanalysis exuberantly and drastically practiced, and how one modest young woman’s life turned psychiatry on its head and radically changed the course of therapy—and our culture, as well.”

If you are interested in investigating the life of Shirley A. Mason AKA Sybil Dorset, Sybil Exposed is a one stop-shopping treasure of resources. The book has:

  • Acknowledgements, 6 pages pgs. 239-246.
  • Notes on chapters, 35 pages from pgs. 247-282.
  • Index, 14 pages from pgs. 283-297.

Author Debbie Nathan, is an award winning journalist who conducted massive research  throughout the United States for Sybil Exposed.

Ms. Nathan is the recipient of national and regional awards, including:

  • The H.L. Mencken Award for Investigative Journalism
  • PEN West Award for Journalism
  • Texas Institute of Letters Award for feature journalism
  • John Barlow Martin Award for Public Service Journalism

With over 30 years of reporting and publishing experience, Ms. Nathan specializes in sexual politics, sex panics particularly in relation to women and children, as well as immigration and the U.S. – Mexican border. She appears in the Academy Award-nominated documentary Capturing the Freidman’s, the story of accused child molesters, Arnold (now deceased) and his son, Jesse Friedman.

Ms. Nathan serves on the board of the National Center for Reason and Justice (NCRJ), a non-profit organization of advocates for intelligent and humane approaches to preventing child abuse and dealing with accused offenders. See About the NCRJ

More about the author on Amazon.com Book Review

Below is a list of resources used by the author including print media, professionals in the mental health field, professors, libraries, laypersons, former psychiatric patients, and films.

Shirley Ardell Mason (1923-1998) pseudonym, Sybil Isabel Dorsett

Mason was born and raised in Dodge Center, Minnesota, USA. The only child of Walter Mason (a carpenter and architect) and Martha Alice “Mattie” Hageman.

Resources used by author Debbie Nathan:

  • Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen, scholar
  • Peter Swales, historian
  • David Eichman, grandson of Shirley Mason’s step-mother, Florence Eichman Mason and David’s wife, Bonnie Eichman
  • Dan Houlihan, University of Minnesota at Mankato (where Shirley attended as an undergraduate)
  • Muriel Odden Coulter, the daughter of a dorm mate of Shirley
  • Dodge Center residents (Sybil/Shirley’s home town)
  • Miranda Marland, daughter of Shirley’s best childhood friend, Robert Moulton
  • Cousins of Shirley: Patricia Alcott, Lorna Gilbert, Arlene Christensen, Marcia Schmidt
  • Dr. Ronald Numbers, University of Wisconsin, an expert on Seventh-Day Adventism (Shirley’s religion)
  • T. Joe Willey, scholar
  • Jean Lane, Shirley’s best friend during college
  • Robert Rieber, John Jay College, NYC, emeritus psychology professor taught with Sybil author, Flora Schreiber
  • Dr. Herbert Spiegel, psychiatrist and hypnotherapist (worked briefly with Shirley)
  • Marcia Greenleaf, psychologist

Psychiatrists practicing in or near New York City during 1950’s & 1960’s when Shirley’s psychoanalyst, Cornelia Wilbur, M.D. was there:

  • Dr. Ann Ruth Turkel
  • Dr. Sylvia Brecher Marer (Rhode Island)
  • Dr. Nathaniel Lehrman
  • Dr. Arthur Zitrin

Dr. Cornelia Wilbur (1908–1992). Born, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, University of Michigan, 1939, M.D. (medical doctor)

Resources for life of Dr. Cornelia Wilbur, M.D.

  • Robert Schade, cousin
  • Deborah Brown Kovac, a niece of Dr. Wilbur’s second husband
  • Neil Burwell, nephew
  • Warner Burwell. great-nephew
  • Douglas Burwell, great-nephew
  • Brenda Burwell Canning, great-niece (lived with Dr. Wilbur in the 1970s)
  • Ruth Barstow Dixon, cousin
  • Dr. Richard Dieterle
  • Caroline Dieterle
  • Dr. Robert Dieterle, psychiatrist (Dr. Wilbur’s professor and mentor), 1930’s
  • Harald Naess, historian of Scandinavian immigration

Others who knew or worked with Dr. Cornelia Wilbur:

  • Dr. Arnold Ludwig, worked with Dr. Wilbur at University of Kentucky, 1970s
  • Dr. Lon Hays
  • Dr. Rosa K. Riggs
  • Dr. German Gutierrez

Others

  • John and Patsy McGee – lived on same street in Dr. Wilbur’s neighborhood
  • Roberta Guy – Shirley Mason’s and Dr. Wilbur’s home-care nurse
  • Mark Boultinghouse – Shirley’s art dealer
  • Dr. Joseph Bieron, chemist and archivist of historical records of his profession

Libraries and Organizations:

  • State Historical Society, St. Paul, MN, USA,  – archival research
  • New York Academy of Medicine
  • American Society for Journalists and Authors, Director Alexandra Owens
  • Society for Magazine Writers
  • University of Iowa Library, special collections department
  • Historical Society in Dodge County, Minnesota, past Director, Earlene Kinga
  • Seventh-Day Adventist Church General Conference, Maryland
  • National Library of Medicine, Maryland
  • John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Special Collections Department
  • Ellen Belcher, Head Archivist, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  • Tania Colmant-Donabedian, Assistant Archivist, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  • Larry Sullivan, Director, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  • Peter Tytell, research assistant to Ms. Nathan
  • Dr. Leah Dickstein, holds several files and papers which belonged to Dr. Wilbur

Scholars, writers, professionals in the mental health field, former-psychiatric patients, and activists

  • Sherrill Mulhern
  • Dr. Harold Mersey, DM FRCP (London) FRCP(C) FRCPsych
  • Evan Harrington
  • Pamela Freyd, Ph.D.
  • Mark Pendergrast, author/journalist
  • Ben Harris
  • Jan Haaken
  • Jeanette Bartha, B.S., psychology, journalist, blogger
  • Bill Dobbs
  • John Bloise
  • Those wishing to remain anonymous

Former Hollywood Celebrities regarding the film, Sybil

  • Stewart Stern, screenwriter for Sybil telemovie
  • Diana Serra Cary – actress who played “Baby Peggy”

International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD)

  • Kathy Steele, former Director
  • Dr. Richard Kluft, M.D. (grateful to him, but he declined to discuss his work with Dr. Cornelia Wilbur) Dr. Kluft permitted Ms. Nathan to attend his presentation at ISSTD Conference
  • Barry Cohen
  • Dr. Vedat Sar
The above information was taken from the text of Sybil Exposed. Errors may be those of blogger rather than the author, Debbie Nathan.

updated: 9-26-14

 

 

 

 

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