Falsely accused father of sexually abusing his children speaks out in interview

Read the full story and get the details of the absurd accusations of two children likely coached by an adult. This post includes a video of the interview. Excerpts below.

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Dad falsely accused of ‘satanic’ abuse speaks of ordeal

Chris Costner Sizemore: AKA The Three Faces of Eve (1927- )

Update 01-11-14. To date, I know of one high profile case of multiple personalities or Dissociative Identity Disorder that did not claim childhood sexual abuse as it antecedent or cause. That case is reported by Hershel Walker, former American football icon, who claims his multiple personalities were caused by childhood bullying.

If there are people out there who claim to have developed multiple personalities by causes other than childhood child abuse, I’d be interested to hear from you.

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Christine (Chris) Costner Sizemore

born 1927 –

Most Noted for:

Diagnosed in the 1950s, she is considered by some to be the first documented case of multiple personality disorder in the 20th century. Chris Sizemore is known by the pseudonym, Eve.

Sizemore had eight psychiatrists during her lengthily treatment that spanned over two decades. Corbett Thigpen and colleague, Hervey Cleckley, M.D., published a book that was a historical case study based on her life titled: “The Three Faces of Eve” which gained best-seller status as did the movie by the same title.

During the later part of her illness and recovery from multiple personality disorder, Chris Sizemore was treated for four years by Dr. Tony Tsitos in Virginia.

Early childhood traumas:

Chris Sizemore, in a YouTube documentary “Hard Talk,” a BBC Interview, said that at the age of two, she experienced three consecutive traumas.

  1. her mother cut her arm badly
  2. she saw a drowned man being recovered from a ditch, heard the word “death,” and began to believe that anyone who was sick or hurt was “dying.”
  3. she witnessed a man cut in half at a lumber yard.

Chris Sizemore repeatedly states that it was with the help of her psychiatrists, devoted family, and her belief in God that saw her through her illness and led to her recovery.

Publications:

1958.  The Final Face of Eve

1977. I’m Eve

1989. A Mind of My Own

Sources:

Georgia Encyclopedia

Sizemore, Chris Costner, 1989. A Mind of My Own.

Wikipedia: “Chris Costner Sizemore”

YouTube: “Multiple Personality Disorder on Hard Talk BBC Interviews – Chris Costner Sizemore, Part I”rumiscience”  watch?v=CTvr2fDBjmg Retrieved 3/14/11.

The Illusive Satanists: What Many in the Multiple Personality Community Believe about Satanic Ritual Abuse

Mr. Satan Head

Mr. Satan Head (Photo credit: Scott Beale)

Last year, at Halloween, I designed a costume and attended Kate’s annual
party. She decorated her property, starting at the curb, with blinking orange
lights, cob webs, and hidden boxes that made unpredictable sounds when I
walked by. The house was dark with intrigue. I wondered what scary characters
awaited my arrival.

After dark, her neighborhood was full of adults and children in costume. We
pretended to be witches or walking trees or scarecrows. We gave ourselves
permission to create, fantasize, and play. For one night, we became someone,
or something, other than ourselves. Mystery and intrigue are what make Kate’s
Halloween parties enticing.

Oddly, treatment for Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), now known as Dissociative
Identity Disorder (DID), has similar enticing qualities. For example, once
labeled a “multiple,” I was often viewed as exotic and mysterious. My thought
patterns and subsequent behaviors were intriguing and bewildering to therapists.
Treatment twisted my thinking. I became a devoted student of repressed memory
therapy
, believing I was raised in a Satanic cult. Therapy helped me “remember”
cult meetings with gory smoldering cauldrons of blood, dismembered animals,
the screech of tormented women, and the foul smell of burning flesh. The
Halloween season, once a time of fun and theatrics, became an annual nightmare
referred to as “The Satanic High Holidays.” Therapy transformed the play of yesteryear into terror.
The Halloween season became life-threatening. My doctor instructed me to
beware of encoded messages sent by Satanists, either by mail or by telephone,
programming me to suicide. He said I needed protection from them because I was
exposing their cult secrets. I agreed to be hospitalized, drugged and
quarantined.

My doctor’s thinking was not logical. In fact, it was pure nonsense. The
tricks, illusions, and deceits of treatment lured me in.

What made it impossible to distinguish fact from fancy? Prior to therapy, I
knew nothing about Satanism. While hospitalized, however, I was inundated with
information about Satanic cults from my doctor, therapists, nurses, other
patients, self- proclaimed “professionals” who survived Satanic abuse, and books.
Initially, I was a willing participant in the exchange of information. Later,
I was a captive audience and my caretakers’ professional opinions quickly
flipped my belief system upside-down.

I often proclaimed that my uncovered “memories” were fabrications, but I was
ignored. New “memories” weren’t as real as those I’d never forgotten; they
were dream-like and fuzzy. The idolatrous manner in which I related to my
doctor blinded me to the truth regarding my history. I was tricked into
believing there was Satanic abuse when, in fact, there wasn’t.

The illusive Satanists never surfaced at Halloween. Just the same, my feelings
of terror were real. Therapy created panic, insomnia, anorexia, abuse of
prescription drugs, gastrointestinal distress and fatigue. My behavior was
irrational. I hid under the bed, shrouded myself in blankets, and hugged
Leroy, my teddy bear.

Unknowingly, I was caught in the web of my doctor’s delusions. Halloween is
payday for some therapists and hospitals because clients are often in a
heightened emotional state. The fabricated Halloween horrors create chaos;
they breed confusion and anxiety. Clients seek comfort and often require extra
with therapists while needing more prescription drugs,additional phone contact,                                               and even hospitalization.

I challenge therapists who treat clients for Satanic abuse to follow their own treatment regime this year. By mid-October, check into a hospital, stay behind locked doors, speak to no one, ingest mass quantities of narcotics, and starve yourselves — then stay awake while watching horror movies night and day.

Since leaving treatment I learned the illusive Satanists, created in therapy, don’t exist. Halloween has returned to what it’s always been — a day of fun, fantasy, and theater. I’m looking forward to Kate’s party.

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Originally published in the False Memory Syndrome Foundation Newsletter,
October, 1999

Apologies for the formatting. The original article does not translate well.

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The Illusive Satanists by Jeanette Bartha is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
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Inpatient Suicide

by the Law Offices of Skip Simpson

The loss of a loved one is devastating

An inpatient suicide is a shock to friends and family. You may have spent time choosing the right facility. You may have placed your loved one into a psychiatric or rehabilitation center, believing he or she would receive increased attention from healthcare providers. Unfortunately, when healthcare providers fail meet the standard of care, or to follow procedures or lack adequate training, inpatient suicides can occur. A suicide might occur because a staff member failed to conduct a regular check of the patient’s well-being. It is not the standard of care to put a suicidal patient on an every 15 minute observation level.

It is estimated 1,500 patients die each year by suicide in our hospitals and many thousands more make non-fatal attempts. Among other factors, investigations have shown these injuries and deaths can be attributed to inadequate staff training in a) how to detect, assess, and communicate suicide risk, and b) how to properly monitor known at-risk patients in the emergency room or hospital.

Dangerous hospital practices persist

Even when clinicians know patients are at elevated risk for suicidal behaviors, antiquated, untested, and dangerous hospital practices persist; e.g., the so-called every 15 minute monitoring level – a routine “intervention” that allows patients 14 minutes and 59 seconds to kill themselves using obvious anchor points, ligatures and sharp instruments.

There is no standard of care that allows healthcare professionals to needlessly endanger patients known to be at risk for suicidal behaviors. Published studies point to improved practice models, use of environmental safety and procedural checklists, and evidence-based training in how to detect, assess, monitor and manage suicidal patients – training that is now accessible, available, affordable, and which establishes the standard of care.

When a patient is at increased risk for suicidal behavior

Suicidality is the most common reason for inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. When a patient is admitted to the hospital because of thoughts of suicide, the clinician and hospital is on notice that the patient is at an increased risk for suicidal behavior. When hospital staff members are aware of a patient’s suicidal tendencies, the hospital assumes the duty to take reasonable steps to prevent the patient from inflicting harm.

Filing a claim can be difficult following a traumatic event. At the Law Offices of Skip Simpson, we provide compassionate representation for family members who have lost loved ones. You and your family have placed a large amount of trust in the medical professionals, from doctors to orderlies. They have a duty to provide their patients with correct diagnoses and to take appropriate action based on the symptoms.

How an inpatient suicide can happen

An inpatient suicide usually occurs in a psychiatric hospital, but can occur in a general hospital. They may have been placed at the facility involuntarily (a court has made a determination that they’re imminently suicidal). They may have checked in to a facility voluntarily.

An inpatient suicide may occur under any of the following circumstances:

  • Inadequate suicide assessment
  • Improper suicide watch or negligent suicide watch
  • An unsafe environment of care
  • Failure to remove environmental dangers
  • Inadequate policies and procedures regarding dangerous contraband
  • Failure to remove shoe laces or belt from patient

In handling an inpatient suicide case, we typically investigate hospital records and patient charts. Our investigation consists of interviews with witnesses and reviews of logs.

Contact our law firm

For a free and confidential consultation, contact a compassionate attorney who cares about people and demands justice. Contact the Law Offices of Skip Simpson. See what we can do for you. Call 214-618-8222 or reach a personal injury lawyer by completing our online contact form.

Retrieved 06/21/12. Reprint by permission.

Conference: International Association for the Study of Trauma & Dissociation

Another conference on discovering and treating multiple personalities. Don’t be fooled by the name change. This is the same organization that was founded to investigate the phenomenon of multiple personalities in the mid-1980s that, according to lawsuits, led to patient harm, familial alienation, and wrongful convictions based on recovered memories of abuse. This group of practitioners and interested parties is probably the only organization of “experts” in psychiatry and psychology that has seen the highest number of medical malpractice lawsuits, medical license revocation, and questionable associations with online degree programs.

I will have reports from the conference when they are available.

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“Exploring and Learning Together:

What We Now Know about Trauma & Dissociation”

October 23-27 || Westin Long Beach || 333 East Ocean Boulevard
Long Beach || California 90802 || United States 

2014 Plenary Speakers

Constance J. Dalenberg, PhD
Alliant International University
Past-President, Division 56 (Trauma Psychology) of the American Psychological Association
Topic: Countertransference and Transference Crises in Working with Traumatized Patients

Jennifer J. Freyd, PhD
University of Oregon
Editor of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation
Topic: Institutional Betrayal

Gail S. Goodman, PhD
University of California
President, Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association
Topic:  Trauma & Memory in Children and Adolescents

Rick Goodwin, MSW, RSW
Steve LePore
, 1in6 Founder and Executive Director

Topic:  Strength & Courage; Addressing Men’s Experiences of Childhood Sexual Abuse


Therese Clemens, ISSTD Executive Director at tclemens@isst-d.org.

The ISSTD Conference Committee

Kevin J. Connors, MS, MFT, Chair
Therese Clemens, Executive Director ISSTD
Lynette Danylchuk, PhD
Philip J. Kinsler, PhD, ex officio
Christa Kruger, MD
Christine Forner, MA, MSW
Florence Hannigan, MA, BSW
Mara Katz, LCSW
Kathy Steele, MN, CS
Vedat Şar, MD
Joan Turkus, MD